All posts in “Mobile”

Salesforce partners with Apple to roll deeper into mobile enterprise markets

Apple and Salesforce are both highly successful, iconic brands, who like to put on a big show when they make product announcements. Today, the two companies announced they were forming a strategic partnership with an emphasis on mobile strategy ahead of Salesforce’s enormous customer conference, Dreamforce, which starts tomorrow in San Francisco.

For Apple, which is has been establishing partnerships with key enterprise brands for the last several years, today’s news is a another big step toward solidifying its enterprise strategy by involving the largest enterprise SaaS vendor in the world.

“We’re forming a strategic partnership with Salesforce to change the way people work and to empower developers of all abilities to build world-class mobile apps,” Susan Prescott, vice president of markets, apps and services at Apple told TechCrunch.

Tim Cook at Apple event on September 12, 2018 Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Bret Taylor, president and chief product at Salesforce, who came over in the Quip deal a couple of years ago, says working together, the two companies can streamline mobile development for customers. “Every single one of our customers is on mobile. They all want world-class mobile experiences, and this enables us when we’re talking to a customer about their mobile strategy, that we can be in that conversation together,” he explained.

For starters, the partnership is going to involve three main components: The two companies are going to work together to bring in some key iOS features such Siri Shortcuts and integration with Apple’s Business Chat into the Salesforce mobile app. Much like the partnership between Apple and IBM, Apple and Salesforce will also work together to build industry-specific iOS apps on the Salesforce platform.

The companies are also working together on a new mobile SDK built specifically for Swift, Apple’s popular programming language. The plan is to provide a way to build Swift apps for iOS and deploy them natively on Salesforce’s Lightning platform.

The final component involves deeper integration with Trailhead, Salesforce’s education platform. That will involve a new Trailhead Mobile app on IOS as well as adding Swift education courses to the Trailhead catalogue to help drive adoption of the mobile SDK.

While Apple has largely been perceived as a consumer-focused organization, as we saw a shift to  companies encouraging employees to bring their own devices to work over the last six or seven years, Apple has benefited. As that has happened, it has been able to take advantage to sell more products and services and has partnered with a number of other well-known enterprise brands including IBMCiscoSAP and GE along with systems integrators Accenture and Deloitte.

The move gives Salesforce a formidable partner to continue their incredible growth trajectory. Just last year the company passed the $10 billion run rate putting it in rarified company with some of the most successful software companies in the world. In their most recent earnings call at the end of August, they reported $3.28 billion for the quarter, placing them on a run rate of over $13 billion. Connecting with Apple could help keep that momentum growing.

The two companies will show off the partnership at Dreamforce this week. It’s a deal that has the potential to work out well for both companies, giving Salesforce a more integrated iOS experience and helping Apple increase its reach into the enterprise.

Armani Exchange’s smartwatch is for those who want their tech to be dapper

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The influx of new Wear OS smartwatches continues with the Armani Exchange Connected, the brand’s first touchscreen smartwatch, which combines a modern design with the latest smartwatch technology. While we say “the latest,” don’t get too excited — this watch is powered by the Snapdragon Wear 2100 platform, not the new Snapdragon 3100. You’ve got to be patient for those.

If you’re scratching your head about this being the first Armani smartwatch, when we’ve seen others in the past, the reason is this is the first to come from the Armani Exchange division. Previously, we’ve tried out Emporio Armani smart and hybrid watches. To help understand the branding, it’s helpful to know that a year ago, Giorgio Armani announced it would concentrate on three brand names — Giorgio, Emporio, and Exchange — rather than the seven it had until that point. Exchange is the entry point into the world of Armani, and appeals to those who still want the look, without the massive price tag. Ideal for a smartwatch.

armani exchange connected smartwatch news colors

What about the watch itself? It’s designed beautifully, with a distinctive but not over-the-top style, and available in gold, black, silver, and coal colors. The case is quite large at 46mm — that’s only a millimeter smaller than the Diesel On Full Guard 2.5 — making it look modern, and provide plenty of on-the-wrist presence. The AMOLED screen is 1.2 inches, so it doesn’t overpower the watch’s case. We’re advocates of the smaller screen on Wear OS watches, as they remain usable without stretching the overall size of the watch itself.

Like other designer smartwatches released recently, the Armani Exchange Connected has GPS inside so you don’t need your phone when out for a hike or run, plus there is a heart rate sensor on the back of the case. These two features join NFC for Google Pay, and swim proof water resistance too. Google’s Wear OS operating system is installed, complete with Google Assistant, and we imagine the watch will receive an update to the new version of the software, which greatly improves usability. The 300mAh battery is likely to be good for a day before needing a recharge.

If you’re tempted, you don’t have to wait for the Armani Exchange Connected watch, as it’s available to buy from armaniexchange.com now, and through selected retailers too. The color is the only differentiating factor between the four models — all have a metal bracelet — and to get one you’ll pay $295.

Editors’ Recommendations

Happy 10th anniversary, Android

It’s been 10 years since Google took the wraps off the G1, the first Android phone. Since that time the OS has grown from buggy, nerdy iPhone alternative to arguably the most popular (or at least populous) computing platform in the world. But it sure as heck didn’t get there without hitting a few bumps along the road.

Join us for a brief retrospective on the last decade of Android devices: the good, the bad, and the Nexus Q.

HTC G1 (2008)

This is the one that started it all, and I have a soft spot in my heart for the old thing. Also known as the HTC Dream — this was back when we had an HTC, you see — the G1 was about as inauspicious a debut as you can imagine. Its full keyboard, trackball, slightly janky slide-up screen (crooked even in official photos), and considerable girth marked it from the outset as a phone only a real geek could love. Compared to the iPhone, it was like a poorly dressed whale.

But in time its half-baked software matured and its idiosyncrasies became apparent for the smart touches they were. To this day I occasionally long for a trackball or full keyboard, and while the G1 wasn’t pretty, it was tough as hell.

Moto Droid (2009)

Of course, most people didn’t give Android a second look until Moto came out with the Droid, a slicker, thinner device from the maker of the famed RAZR. In retrospect, the Droid wasn’t that much better or different than the G1, but it was thinner, had a better screen, and had the benefit of an enormous marketing push from Motorola and Verizon. (Disclosure: Verizon owns Oath, which owns TechCrunch, but this doesn’t affect our coverage in any way.)

For many, the Droid and its immediate descendants were the first Android phones they had — something new and interesting that blew the likes of Palm out of the water, but also happened to be a lot cheaper than an iPhone.

HTC/Google Nexus One (2010)

This was the fruit of the continued collaboration between Google and HTC, and the first phone Google branded and sold itself. The Nexus One was meant to be the slick, high-quality device that would finally compete toe-to-toe with the iPhone. It ditched the keyboard, got a cool new OLED screen, and had a lovely smooth design. Unfortunately it ran into two problems.

First, the Android ecosystem was beginning to get crowded. People had lots of choices and could pick up phones for cheap that would do the basics. Why lay the cash out for a fancy new one? And second, Apple would shortly release the iPhone 4, which — and I was an Android fanboy at the time — objectively blew the Nexus One and everything else out of the water. Apple had brought a gun to a knife fight.

HTC Evo 4G (2010)

Another HTC? Well, this was prime time for the now-defunct company. They were taking risks no one else would, and the Evo 4G was no exception. It was, for the time, huge: the iPhone had a 3.5-inch screen, and most Android devices weren’t much bigger, if they weren’t smaller.

The Evo 4G somehow survived our criticism (our alarm now seems extremely quaint, given the size of the average phone now) and was a reasonably popular phone, but ultimately is notable not for breaking sales records but breaking the seal on the idea that a phone could be big and still make sense. (Honorable mention goes to the Droid X.)

Samsung Galaxy S (2010)

Samsung’s big debut made a hell of a splash, with custom versions of the phone appearing in the stores of practically every carrier, each with their own name and design: the AT&T Captivate, T-Mobile Vibrant, Verizon Fascinate, and Sprint Epic 4G. As if the Android lineup wasn’t confusing enough already at the time!

Though the S was a solid phone, it wasn’t without its flaws, and the iPhone 4 made for very tough competition. But strong sales reinforced Samsung’s commitment to the platform, and the Galaxy series is still going strong today.

Motorola Xoom (2011)

This was an era in which Android devices were responding to Apple, and not vice versa as we find today. So it’s no surprise that hot on the heels of the original iPad we found Google pushing a tablet-focused version of Android with its partner Motorola, which volunteered to be the guinea pig with its short-lived Xoom tablet.

Although there are still Android tablets on sale today, the Xoom represented a dead end in development — an attempt to carve a piece out of a market Apple had essentially invented and soon dominated. Android tablets from Motorola, HTC, Samsung and others were rarely anything more than adequate, though they sold well enough for a while. This illustrated the impossibility of “leading from behind” and prompted device makers to specialize rather than participate in a commodity hardware melee.

Amazon Kindle Fire (2011)

And who better to illustrate than Amazon? Its contribution to the Android world was the Fire series of tablets, which differentiated themselves from the rest by being extremely cheap and directly focused on consuming digital media. Just $200 at launch and far less later, the Fire devices catered to the regular Amazon customer whose kids were pestering them about getting a tablet on which to play Fruit Ninja or Angry Birds, but who didn’t want to shell out for an iPad.

Turns out this was a wise strategy, and of course one Amazon was uniquely positioned to do with its huge presence in online retail and the ability to subsidize the price out of the reach of competition. Fire tablets were never particularly good, but they were good enough, and for the price you paid, that was kind of a miracle.

Xperia Play (2011)

Sony has always had a hard time with Android. Its Xperia line of phones for years were considered competent — I owned a few myself — and arguably industry-leading in the camera department. But no one bought them. And the one they bought the least of, or at least proportional to the hype it got, has to be the Xperia Play. This thing was supposed to be a mobile gaming platform, and the idea of a slide-out keyboard is great — but the whole thing basically cratered.

What Sony had illustrated was that you couldn’t just piggyback on the popularity and diversity of Android and launch whatever the hell you wanted. Phones didn’t sell themselves, and although the idea of playing Playstation games on your phone might have sounded cool to a few nerds, it was never going to be enough to make it a million-seller. And increasingly that’s what phones needed to be.

Samsung Galaxy Note (2012)

As a sort of natural climax to the swelling phone trend, Samsung went all out with the first true “phablet,” and despite groans of protest the phone not only sold well but became a staple of the Galaxy series. In fact, it wouldn’t be long before Apple would follow on and produce a Plus-sized phone of its own.

The Note also represented a step towards using a phone for serious productivity, not just everyday smartphone stuff. It wasn’t entirely successful — Android just wasn’t ready to be highly productive — but in retrospect it was forward thinking of Samsung to make a go at it and begin to establish productivity as a core competence of the Galaxy series.

Google Nexus Q (2012)

This abortive effort by Google to spread Android out into a platform was part of a number of ill-considered choices at the time. No one really knew, apparently at Google or anywhere elsewhere in the world, what this thing was supposed to do. I still don’t. As we wrote at the time:

Here’s the problem with the Nexus Q:  it’s a stunningly beautiful piece of hardware that’s being let down by the software that’s supposed to control it.

It was made, or rather nearly made in the USA, though, so it had that going for it.

HTC First — “The Facebook Phone” (2013)

The First got dealt a bad hand. The phone itself was a lovely piece of hardware with an understated design and bold colors that stuck out. But its default launcher, the doomed Facebook Home, was hopelessly bad.

How bad? Announced in April, discontinued in May. I remember visiting an AT&T store during that brief period and even then the staff had been instructed in how to disable Facebook’s launcher and reveal the perfectly good phone beneath. The good news was that there were so few of these phones sold new that the entire stock started selling for peanuts on Ebay and the like. I bought two and used them for my early experiments in ROMs. No regrets.

HTC One/M8 (2014)

This was the beginning of the end for HTC, but their last few years saw them update their design language to something that actually rivaled Apple. The One and its successors were good phones, though HTC oversold the “Ultrapixel” camera, which turned out to not be that good, let alone iPhone-beating.

As Samsung increasingly dominated, Sony plugged away, and LG and Chinese companies increasingly entered the fray, HTC was under assault and even a solid phone series like the One couldn’t compete. 2014 was a transition period with old manufacturers dying out and the dominant ones taking over, eventually leading to the market we have today.

Google/LG Nexus 5X and Huawei 6P (2015)

This was the line that brought Google into the hardware race in earnest. After the bungled Nexus Q launch, Google needed to come out swinging, and they did that by marrying their more pedestrian hardware with some software that truly zinged. Android 5 was a dream to use, Marshmallow had features that we loved … and the phones became objects that we adored.

We called the 6P “the crown jewel of Android devices”. This was when Google took its phones to the next level and never looked back.

Google Pixel (2016)

If the Nexus was, in earnest, the starting gun for Google’s entry into the hardware race, the Pixel line could be its victory lap. It’s an honest-to-god competitor to the Apple phone.

Gone are the days when Google is playing catch-up on features to Apple, instead, Google’s a contender in its own right. The phone’s camera is amazing. The software works relatively seamlessly (bring back guest mode!), and phone’s size and power are everything anyone could ask for. The sticker price, like Apple’s newest iPhones, is still a bit of a shock, but this phone is the teleological endpoint in the Android quest to rival its famous, fruitful, contender.

Let’s see what the next ten years bring.

The best iPhone XR screen protectors

iPhone XR
Julian Chokkattu/Digital Trends

The iPhone XR is the cheapest of the latest range of iPhones, but it’s by no means a lesser product. It’s powered by the same powerful A12 Bionic processor as its kin, and it still rocks the gorgeous look launched with last year’s iPhone X.

Keeping your new iPhone protected should always be a top priority. You might have your iPhone XR case picked out, but what about the screen? The XR isn’t equipped with the AMOLED display you’ll find on the iPhone XS and XS Max, but it still comes with a gorgeous and all-new Liquid Retina LCD display. Keep the window into your iOS world open and crack-free with our selection of the best iPhone XR screen protectors.

Spigen Glas.tr ($30)

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If you’re looking for phone protection, one of your first stops should be Spigen’s huge range of protective cases. But why stop there? Spigen also provides a pretty great glass screen protector. Spigen’s tempered-glass screen protector has a hardness of 9H that helps resist scratches and chips. It’s treated with an oleophobic coating that stops oily fingerprints from marring your view and prevents minor scratches. It works perfectly with all of Spigen’s cases, and it’s easy to apply. It’s not among the cheapest options on this list by a long shot — but Spigen’s a name you can count on.

Buy it now from:

Spigen Amazon

Rhinoshield Impact Protection ($25)

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Rhinoshield started with screen protection in mind, so it’s no mistake that we’ve included it in our list. This film screen protector is so tough that Rhinoshield claims it can handle impacts from a hammer, and is five times as tough as Gorilla Glass 3. That’s a heck of a claim, and not one we’re going to test — and neither should you — but it says a lot that Rhinoshield is willing to make such a claim. The Impact Protection edition is super-thin at just 0.29 mm, and it also comes with an oleophobic layer to resist fingerprints. As a film screen protector though, it won’t have the same strength as a glass protector. It’s compatible with Rhinoshield’s cases, but like the Spigen screen protector, it’s rather expensive. Still, if it lives up to the hype, it’s probably worth the cash.

Buy it now from:

Rhinoshield

Moshi IonGlass Privacy ($45)

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If you value your privacy, you have information that needs protecting, or even if you just bank on your mobile, having a screen protector that protects your privacy is a must. Moshi’s IonGlass Privacy fades to black when viewed at any angle other than head on, making it harder for snoopers to spy on your screen. Moshi also claims it’s been hardened at a molecular level and is 40 percent thinner than other glass protectors. It’s also one of the most expensive items on this list — but if it keeps your private information hidden from prying eyes, it might be worth the cash.

Buy it now from:

Moshi

Olixar Screen Protector Twin Pack ($8)

best iphone xr screen protectors olixar

Do you just need something to cover up your screen at a great price? Check out this double-pack from Olixar. These screen protectors are made from durable and flexible film that should be able to resist scratches that might otherwise damage your device. Being made from film, it won’t be as impact-resistant as a tempered-glass screen protector — and it probably won’t do much to prevent a shatter from a fall — but it will still offer some protection against most everyday hazards. Olixar claims these protectors won’t hamper your touch-sensitivity, or reduce your screen’s clarity, and they’re easy to apply.

Buy it now from:

Mobile Fun

Otterbox Alpha Glass ($40)

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Another name with an incredible pedigree, Otterbox is the doyen of protective cases — and you’ll find some good protection for your screen from it, too. Otterbox’s Alpha Glass protector is made from reinforced glass that adheres closely to your screen, preventing damage from reaching your phone. It’s super-thin, doesn’t impair screen clarity or your touchscreen responsiveness, and it’s easy to install. Unfortunately, it is on the expensive side, but it will work perfectly with any Otterbox cases.

Buy it now from:

Otterbox

Skinomi TechSkin Twin Pack ($9)

best iphone xr screen protectors skinomi

Here’s another cheaper film alternative in a double pack — but there’s a twist in this particular tale. Skinomi claims that the TechSkin is the toughest clear film protector on the market, and is made from the same film covering that protects luxury cars, military aircraft, and NASA space shuttles. We can’t back that up, but we do know that the TechSkin’s multiple-layer construction gives it self-healing properties, protects against UV yellowing, and adds puncture-resistance. It’s not going to be as protective as a glass protector, but if you want as thin a protector as possible, then the TechSkin is worth considering. It also comes with a lifetime warranty, which is nice.

Buy it now from:

Skinomi Amazon

InvisibleShield Glass+ VisionGuard ($45)

best iphone xr screen protectors invisibleshield

So-called blue light from phone screens can have a variety of effects on humans, including keeping us up at night. Rather than using a software-based filter that tints the screen, why not buy a screen protector that directly blocks the harmful light? That’s the idea behind the Glass+ VisionGuard. This protector uses a special layer to filter out the troublesome light, meaning it never even leaves the screen, and can’t affect you. It doesn’t change the look of the screen, it’s as strong as a normal glass protector, and comes with a 100 percent clarity rating. Like most of the protectors from the big name brands on this list, it’s expensive, but with a headline feature like this, it may be worth the cash.

Buy it now from:

InvisibleShield Amazon

IQ Shield LiQuid Shield Twin Pack ($9)

best iphone xr screen protectors iq shield

Need more film protector options? Check out IQ Shield’s LiQuid Shield, which completely covers your iPhone XR’s curved screen, molding itself around the edges and curves of your device to ensure that no part of your iPhone’s screen goes unprotected. That full coverage could interfere with some cases, though most will be able to clip over the top of the thin film. It’s treated to prevent yellowing over time, keeping it looking newer for longer. It comes in a twin pack, and it’s also covered by a lifetime guarantee.

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IQ Shield

Poetic Glass Screen Protector ($10)

best iphone xr screen protectors poetic

Glass screen protectors don’t usually come this cheap, and that makes Poetic’s screen protector worthy of a mention. It has everything you’d hope for from a glass protector, including a hardness of 9H, an oleophobic layer to prevent fingerprint smears, and a high level of transparency. Poetic also claims it’s easy to apply, with no risk of bubbling, and is just 0.3 mm thick. Poetic manages to match the features of more expensive protectors for just $10.

Poetic Amazon

UAG Glass Screen Shield ($40)

best iphone xr screen protectors uag

Last, but certainly not least, is UAG’s excellent Glass Screen Shield. It’s made from 9H hardness tempered glass, so it should be resistant against most types of damage, and should be able to withstand impacts. It’s treated with an oleophobic coating to reduce fingerprint smears, and it shouldn’t hinder touchscreen sensitivity or clarity. The real selling point here is its thickness. At just 0.2 mm thick, UAG’s protector is one of the thinnest around, which means it’ll be even harder to notice that you’re using a screen protector at all. While it’s expensive, if you’re willing to pay a premium, this thin protector should work well.

Buy it now from:

UAG

Editors’ Recommendations

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Click-to-brew beer, comfy headlamps, and more

At any given moment, there are approximately a zillion different crowdfunding campaigns happening on the web. Take a stroll through Kickstarter or Indiegogo and you’ll find no shortage of weird, useless, and downright stupid projects out there — alongside some real gems. We’ve cut through the fidget spinners and janky iPhone cases to round up the most unusual, ambitious, and exciting new crowdfunding projects out there this week. That said, keep in mind that any crowdfunding project — even those with the best intentions — can fail, so do your homework before cutting a check for the gadget of your dreams.

September 23rd

Biolite headlamp

Whether you enjoy hiking, camping, or merely going for a run at night, a headlamp is an invaluable accessory, giving you a hands-free way to illuminate the path in front of you. Headlamps, however, can be uncomfortable (given you’re basically strapping a flashlight to your head), which makes the new BioLite headlamp something of a godsend. It’s a lightweight, slimmed-down design that doesn’t sacrifice decent lighting.

The main thing that stands out about the BioLite is the cushy design. The headband is made of moisture-wicking material, with electronics woven into the fabric to cut down on bulk. A lot of headlamps put all the weight up front, which means the devices often tend to slide down; the BioLite moves the battery to the back, more evenly distributing the weight around the user’s head. The BioLite has a few lighting modes: Red light, strobe light, and white light, which comes in both a short but wide flood mode and a longer, narrower spot mode. Producing 330 lumens, the BioLite is on par with one of our favorite headlamps, and at the lowest setting, it can last up to 40 hours on a single charge.

Sail electric skateboard

Electric skateboards let you zip around the city at (relatively) high speeds, but that luxury often comes at a steep price. The Sail electric skateboard is a product designed to be a little less intimidating – it’s a lightweight, affordable skateboard designed for smooth handling. The Sail cuts a slim profile (12mm), thanks in part to the fact that the battery pack, built to the same thickness as the deck, is built into the deck. The skateboard weighs a mere 11 pounds, so it’s easy to carry around.

The deck sits close to the ground, giving users better control over the skateboard as they steer it, but wipeouts are always a possibility. Thankfully, the Sail is built of sturdy materials, and the battery bends as the board does, so you can ride without worries. The Sail has a range of 10 miles on a single charge, putting it on par with our favorte electric skateboard, the Inboard M1 — and it’s three pounds lighter!

Beermkr

Homebrewing is a popular hobby, offering beer enthusiasts the chance to get creative and stimulate their minds before they start enjoying the fruits of their labors, but it also requires a huge investment of time. So much of homebrewing is waiting for ingredients to boil or ferment — or scrubbing equipment afterwards. The creators of the BeerMKR hope to make homebrewing more accessible by automating most of the process. How does it work? Inside the BeerMKR are three chambers: The brewing chamber, brew pouch, and a collection bin for the waste. To get a brew going, users simply have to pour water into the machine, dump their ingredients in the brewing chamber, and let the BeerMKR do its thing.

Users control the BeerMKR via an app; after pressing a button to start the brew, you can simply sit back and watch. The app will alert users when it’s time to step in and add yeast, for example, but for the most part, the BeerMKR runs on autopilot. According to BeerMKR’s creators, setting up a batch should only take around 5 minutes, with a brewing cycle taking a week. Once you’ve got your completed batch, you just take the airtight beer bag from the machine, put it in the dispenser that comes with the machine, and plug in a CO2 cartridge. Voila! Beer on tap, right in your own kitchen.

The components are dishwasher safe, so you don’t need to spend time scrubbing them after each brew. The BeerMKR team offers kits for users to brew with, but the makers also emphasize that you can brew with whatever ingredients you want — your imagination might be the most valuable ingredient of all.

Atom 3-axis smartphone gimbal

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As smartphone cameras continue to improve, aspiring filmmakers have been using them to make professional films — the critically acclaimed movie Tangerine was even shot on iPhones! Shaky hands are the bane of the handheld cinematographer, however, and to solve that problem, there’s the Atom 3-axis smartphone gimbal. For those unfamiliar, a gimbal is a mount that allows the user to move a camera smoothly, keeping the shot from wavering. True to its name, the Atom is small — not literally atom-sized, but small enough to feel comfortable in the user’s hand. It even folds up for easy transportation while traveling.

The Atom can hold up to 310 grams, which means it can handle a lens on top of a smartphone; the device itself only weighs 440 grams, so it won’t require arms like Popeye. There are multiple devices within thumb’s reach for various operations, whether you need to spin the camera to a vertical orientation, focus, zoom, or otherwise.

Oru Kayak Haven

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What’s better than origami? How about origami you can sail the high seas in? With the Haven Kayak, the latest from Oru Kayak, you can — and with a buddy, no less! If you’ve missed our coverage of previous Oru releases, the gist is this: They’re foldable kayaks that can carry you across the water yet compress to fit in the trunk of a car or a closet. Don’t let the namesake fool you, though! Rather than thin sheets of paper, Oru’s kayaks are made of sturdy polymer that is nevertheless lightweight. The Haven weighs 40 pounds, but can support up to 500 pounds, and can seat two adults.

The sleek, lightweight design of the Haven makes it easy to handle, and if you want to tear up the water by yourself, you can adjust the interior to make a single-rider, high-performance kayak. If you like to take things easy, though, the Haven sports a rail mount system on which you can fasten various accessories like cupholders or fishing rods.