WhatsApp finally lets you recall messages you’ve sent by mistake


WhatsApp has finally got your back when you send a message to the wrong person or group.

The Facebook-owned messaging app is rolling out a feature that will finally let its 1 billion-plus users delete a message for all people within a conversation.

Right now, the app’s delete feature is fairly useless as it only removes a message for the person who sent it. That means that those the message wasn’t intended for can still read it. But this new update will give the option to “delete for everyone,” which rids it from the chat for all. Instead, they will see a notification explaining the message has been removed.

The feature is still rolling out, so not everyone has it yet: I don’t, but at least one of my TechCrunch colleagues does. More details can be found on the company’s FAQ page:

To delete messages for everyone

Deleting messages for everyone allows you to delete specific messages you have sent to either a group or an individual chat. This is particularly useful if you sent a message to the wrong chat or if the message you sent contains a mistake.

Messages you successfully delete for everyone will be replaced with “This message was deleted” in your recipients’ chats (*). Similarly, if you see “This message was deleted” in a chat, it means that the sender deleted their message for everyone.

You can only delete messages for everyone for up to seven minutes after sending. Once seven minutes have passed, there is no way to delete messages for everyone.

The sole caveat for that is that all conversation participants must have the latest version of WhatsApp installed on their device. That’s a pretty major deal-breaker at this point but, as time goes by and more people update their app, the option to undo those embarrassing mis-messages will apply to more and more conversations.

Most WhatsApp users will agree that this update is long overdue.

Featured Image: STAN HONDA/Getty Images

Apple debuts its first MacBook sleeve


Apple has been making gadgets for decades. And as one of the world’s favorite consumer electronics makers, the company has also made plenty of cases and sleeves to protect those gadgets, most notably for the iPhone and iPad. But Apple has never made its own laptop/MacBook sleeve, until today.

While many hit up the Apple website today for the launch of iPhone X pre-orders, they may not have noticed the new 12-inch MacBook sleeve that also went live today.

At $149, you can rest assured that this laptop sleeve is indeed ‘designed by Apple in California’. And if that weren’t enough, the Apple logo is stitched on to the case itself.

The laptop sleeve comes in Saddle Brown and Midnight Blue, and is made from ‘high-quality European leather with a soft microfiber lining’, according to the company’s website.

Oh, and the sleeve has a little opening to let you charge your MacBook while it’s wearing a new leather coat.

Check out Apple’s first MacBook sleeve here.

U.S. iPhone users will spend an average of $88 per year on apps by 2020


U.S. iPhone users will spend an average of $88 per year on paid apps and in-app purchases by 2020, according to a new forecast out this week from Sensor Tower. The firm found that the dollar amount spent on apps and in-app purchases is continuing to increase, year-over-year. iPhone users spent an average of $63 this year, up 33 percent over 2016. And by 2019, the increase over 2016 will have grown to 86 percent.

Next year, Sensor Tower estimates the average spending per active U.S. device will grow to $77, before reaching $88 by 2020.

As you may expect, much of this revenue comes from games.

The majority of spending – almost 70 percent – will come from games. As much as $60 of that $88 will be on paid game downloads and in-game purchases.

But games are not the only category helping grow these figures, the report notes.

Other categories that will see contribute to this revenue growth include Entertainment and Music. Because of the rise of over-the-top and streaming services, like HBO NOW and Netflix, the Entertainment category will overtake Music this year, to become the second largest contributor to per-device spending.

Says Sensor Tower, it will grow its share of the projected $88 in 2019 to over 9 percent, or at least $8, up from just $2.80 in 2016.

The new forecast follows a report from App Annie released earlier this week, which indicates a similar trend in app revenue.

According to App Annie’s estimates, global app revenue and downloads hit record levels last quarter, and those numbers are continuing to rise. But App Annie pegged much of this growth on the rise of emerging markets, like China and India. Sensor Tower’s forecast indicates that app revenue growth is still taking place stateside, as well.

image credits: Sensor Tower

Some asshole is reselling his iPhone X pre-order for $60,000 on eBay

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‘Tis the season… to be scalping!

Just hours after Apple’s iPhone X went up for pre-order around the world, some asshole has already listed the hard-to-get-your-hands-on “all-screen” device for a whopping $59,999 on eBay.

Screw this guy. But also screw anyone who’s stupid and desperate enough to buy it from him.

Look, I take no joy in calling anyone an asshole, but when you’re scalping an iPhone X at a 5,117 percent mark up. Screw you, man.

I understand that it’s simple supply and demand, and some of these sellers are legitimately just trying to make a living, and it’s just simple business. 

But seriously, what the hell, man? 

The device up for sale is a 256GB model that sells for $1,150. Don’t be that idiot who pays this ridiculous price. It’s not worth it.

Need another reason? The seller can’t even guarantee you’ll get the iPhone X on launch day on Nov. 3. Estimated delivery time is between Oct. 30 (impossible unless they get it early somehow) and Nov. 13. Worse, the screenshot of the pre-ordered iPhone X shows a delivery date of Nov. 17-24. 

Screw that.

On that note, don’t pay markup prices at all from anywhere. You’re better than that.

Don’t fall for it. It’s just a new iPhone. Relax and breathe. It’s not the end of the world if you don’t have one. And if anyone, like your significant other tells you otherwise, dump their ass.

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You can save 29% on this light-up keyboard for your gaming setup

This light-up rainbow keyboard looks like it could quite literally step up your game and right now, it’s 29% off.

It boasts a classic keyboard design, but it still features all of the keys you need for any form of modern entertainment. It’s got macro support to streamline any of your longer keystrokes so you can get an edge on opponents in any game you’re playing. The backlights themselves are also completely programmable. You can highlight the keys that you use to play games, or you can simply decorate your keyboard to fit your aesthetic.

This keyboard typically goes for $119.99, but you can pick one up now for $84.99 and save $35.

Buy it here.

Startup studios go Hollywood as CAA launches Creative Labs


The ties that bind the tech industry and Hollywood continue to get tighter as the Creative Artists Agency launches a startup studio to develop new businesses with — and for — its roster of clients.

Continuing a tradition that began with the incubation and launch of Funny or Die (alongside Sequoia Capital and Will Ferrell’s Gary Sanchez Productions), one of Hollywood’s top agencies is partnering with a group of Canadian investors to finance a new venture studio, Creative Labs, with $12.5 million.

“We have been incubating companies at CAA over the years,” says CAA’s head of business development, Michael Yanover.

Yanover was the principal architect of the agency’s work with Funny or Die and Whosay, an influencer marketing company, as well as the firm’s work with CAA Ventures — its venture capital arm. That business has backed some solid companies, including: August, Bark + Co., Drone Racing League, Giphy, Medium and Patreon.

For Yanover, the creation of Creative Labs was a response to the shifting expectations of later-stage venture investors — including his own CAA Ventures, he said.

“Every time we came up with one of these ideas we had to put the money together and raise the money… it was somewhat tedious to build this stuff from scratch,” he said. “The marketplace was changing [and] today you can’t really do that. You have to build something because investors want to see a product and something launched.”

Photographer: J. R. EYERMAN/TimePix

So in 2015, when the capital crunch in startupland was beginning to take hold, Yanover and his team decided to build a startup foundry model that could incubate and spin out companies with fully baked products.

In a sign of both the globalization of the entertainment business and the tech industry, the new studio will be based in Vancouver and includes backing from large Canadian and U.K.-based media industry players like Entertainment One, Boat Rocker Media (through its venture arm) and The Telegraph Media Group.

“Vancouver we picked for a couple of very clear reasons,” says Creative Labs’ co-founder Leonard Brody, a Canadian serial entrepreneur and investor. “It had a very strong developer base that was more loyal and [is] less troublesome keeping talent than you would see in other hubs… [and] you have this real deep strength around project management.”

For early-stage companies that, in some cases, are little more than an idea and a celebrity advocate, the need for a project manager to guide a business is critical, according to Brody.

Creative Labs’ chief executive, Mike Edwards, agreed. A former social media marketing executive, Edwards was brought on board to head operations from Mobio Technologies where he had served as chief executive officer.

To ensure the alignment of interests, employees of the studio have an equity stake in the venture studio and will be able to receive equity in all of the businesses that are spun out from it. They also have the option of graduating from the studio to participate in the development of the individual startups as those businesses mature, Edwards said.

“Part of the genesis story of the lab was also a realization that the media and entertainment and sports world has really changed,” said Brody. “The industry itself has changed. The old model was you used to sell product for other people… you were selling stuff for others… as the platforms evolved where talent could speak direct to consumers you realized you could sell your own things and build your own brands and really have the direct relationship.”

That’s what Creative Labs is trying to capture.

Yanover said that the venture studio has identified three kinds of opportunities that correspond to the three ways he was building businesses internally at CAA in the past.

One is developing an idea around an artist or athlete that the agency represents — like Funny or Die. Already, Creative Labs has one such company waiting in the wings.

Founded by the actress Emma Roberts and the former Huffington Post video producer and creative talent manager Karah Preiss, Belletrist is sort of a next-generation book club for a new literary set.

The company soft-launched in April with an interview between Roberts, a lifelong lover of literature, and the literary icon Joan Didion.

If Belletrist is an example of a platform created around a CAA client, then Creative Labs’ other brainchild, Ground Control, is a company that was created with CAA’s roster of talent in mind.

The startup looks to tap actors, athletes and other celebrities and bring their talents to the voice operating systems developed by tech companies like Apple, Amazon and Alphabet. Founded by former AOL executive Michael Macadaan, Yanover said that Ground Control is akin to the firm’s development of Whosay in that it’s a platform that can use CAA’s client roster to succeed.

Finally, there are companies that dovetail with the work that CAA does internally, or tap the company’s own talented pool of developers, designers and programmers. There’s a yet-to-be launched game development company that falls into that category, according to Yanover, Edwards and Brody.

Yanover, Edwards, Brody, seasoned media and gaming executive Pauline Moller and CAA’s Head of Mobile Michael Blank will all serve as members of the Creative Labs board of directors.

“The premise of anything that we incubate is that we want to bring a piece of CAA’s DNA into the mix,” says Yanover. “We want to embrace the company as one of our children and we want to give it all of the resources that CAA has.”

[Update: This story has been updated to correct the identification of investor Boat Rocker Media, not Boat Rocker Entertainment as was originally indicated.]

Featured Image: David Wall Photo/Getty Images

And it’s gone: iPhone X pre-orders now ship in December

If you’re looking to pre-order an iPhone X, be aware that in the U.S., you’ll need to wait until December to actually get the phone. 

Right now, the shipping date for all variants of the device — 64GB or 256GB, Silver or Space Gray — is five to six weeks. 

Given the numerous rumors that Apple doesn’t have nearly enough iPhone X units to satisfy demand, this actually isn’t that bad, though with the U.S. just waking up, those shipping times might get extended further. 

Image: Stan Schroeder/APple

The pre-orders for the iPhone X on Apple’s website opened at around 3 a.m. ET on Friday, and initially the shipping times were 2-3 weeks, but this quickly changed into 4-5 weeks, and then to 5-6 weeks. 

In Apple’s UK online store, the shipping time was 5-6 weeks for all variants of the phone right after pre-orders went live, and it hasn’t changed since. 

If you don’t want to wait until December, you can still try and get an iPhone X in one of Apple’s retail store on Nov. 3. That, however, will likely include waiting in a long, long line. 

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iPhone X screen repair will cost $279

The iPhone X went on sale today, and with it, Apple released some information about the phone’s repair pricing — and like the phone itself, it gets expensive. If you don’t have the extended warranty, a screen replacement will cost $279. That’s more than twice the price of an iPhone 6 screen replacement ($129) and about 65 percent higher than a new iPhone 8 screen ($169). The pricing was first spotted by MacRumors.

If that sounds high, you should be careful not to damage an iPhone X in any other way: all other out-of-warranty repairs will cost $549. Again, that’s a lot more than what other recent iPhones cost to repair. iPhone 8 repairs cost $349 and 8 Plus repairs cost $399. That means if you crack the glass back of the iPhone X (or the iPhone 8), you might just want to live with it.

Apple’s extended warranty, AppleCare+, often looks like a pricey upsell. But for iPhone X buyers, it seems like it might be a necessary safety net. Apple’s warranty costs $199 for the iPhone X (up from $129 for the iPhone 8 and $149 for the 8 Plus); but while the warranty itself is more expensive, warranty service fees (which apply only when Apple is repairing something with “accidental damage”) don’t go up at all. So an iPhone X can still get a $29 screen repair if it’s under warranty, and it can still get a $99 repair for anything else under AppleCare+, too.

Buying AppleCare+ is usually more of a gamble. On the iPhone 8, for instance, paying to replace your broken screen once out of warranty would be cheaper than having to replace your screen once with the warranty. The warranty would only be worth it if something else went wrong with your phone within three years — though that’s certainly a possibility (I’ve bought and used the warranty on iPhones before, like when my 5S’s camera stopped working).

For the iPhone X, on the other hand, you could crack and replace the screen twice under warranty ($257) and still pay less than a single out-of-warranty screen replacement ($279). And given that you’re already spending over $1,000 on the phone, that’s not a bad insurance policy, since it also fully covers repairs for when the device just stops working on its own.

While the repair prices look high, it’s not all that surprising to see them jump up so much. Apple has to go to Samsung to get the OLED panels on the front of the iPhone X. Because Samsung is the only company that can supply those screens, they’re going to be expensive. And because they’re likely being supplied in limited quantities — due to production complexities like carving out that notch — the price on these is going to be even higher.

More than half a million dishwashers recalled due to fire risk

Why it matters to you

Dishwashers are supposed to be convenient, not fire hazards. If you think you are affected, check your dishwasher’s serial number before using it.

Own a dishwasher at home? If so, it may be worth it to double check the manufacturer and model number. BSH Home Appliances, the manufacturer of Bosch and other top of the line dishwashers, has expanded its two-year-old recall relating to power cords that are overheating and catching fire.

Back in 2015, BSH Home Appliance announced the original recall with the Consumer Product Safety Commission. This included 194,000 dishwashers across the Bosch, Thermador, Gaggenau, and Jenn-Air brands. BSH reported ten cases of power cords overheating, five of which started fires that caused property damage. The overheating occurred during use, not when the dishwashers were sitting idle.

Two years later, BSH has received five additional reports of power cords overheating, catching fire, and causing property damage. This has caused the firm to recall an extra 459,000 dishwashers, bringing the total to 663,000 across the United States and Canada. No injuries have been reported.

The dishwasher recall includes various models that have been manufactured by BSH Home Appliances over a span of seven years, from January 2008 to January 2017. They were available in stainless steel, black, white, or with a custom panel. Prices ranged from $850 to $2,600.

If dishwasher users own one of the affected models, BSH urges them to arrange for a free inspection and replacement power cord. According to Consumer Reports, the repair should take less than an hour. Besides checking the CPSC recall notice, owners can also call the BSH recall hotline at 888-965-5813 for more information.

Before going online or calling the hotline, users should know where to find their model and serial numbers. Often times, these are printed inside the dishwasher on either the top or side of the inner door panel. Bosch suggests owners pay extra attention to their serial numbers since not every unit from the same model line is included in the recall.

While they don’t happen all the time, recalls are not uncommon when items are mass produced. Last year, Samsung had to recall washing machines due to an issue with exploding.

To check whether a dishwasher is part of the recall, Bosch, Gaggenau, Jenn-Air, and Thermador all have sites where you can enter your information.

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