All posts in “Bing”

Apple finally ditches Bing for Siri’s search results

Siri will depend on Google search now, like the rest of the civilized world.
Siri will depend on Google search now, like the rest of the civilized world.

Image: brittany herbert/mashable

The next time you ask Siri a question, Apple’s AI will finally offer up search results to help you find an answer using Google, like the rest of the civilized world.   

Apple is dumping Microsoft’s Bing as the default search platform for Siri, Search inside iOS, and Spotlight on Macs in favor of Google, according to Tech Crunch

The iPhone maker said that the switch is being made in order to create a more “consistent web search experience” for its users, since Google is currently the default search engine on its Safari browser thanks to a reported $3 billion annual deal between the two companies. 

Google doesn’t get the whole Apple search pie, however. Bing will still offer up image search results for queries through Siri.

Apple has used Bing for Siri’s search functionality since iOS 7 in 2013. It was a major coup for Microsoft at the time — Apple and Google had also tussled over the YouTube app the year before — but now, the search tides have shifted back in Google’s favor. The aforementioned deal between Apple and Google might have played a part in the shift for Siri, but we can’t be sure without knowing its terms.

News of the move to Google comes the same day the latest version of macOS, High Sierra, was released to the public, so users upgrading to the new OS will find their new Spotlight search is now powered by Google. iOS device owners should have the update, too — so ask Siri to search for something, and rest assured that your answers are coming from Google. 

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Bing launches Google-like fact-checking label

Bing is taking action against fake news, in a similar fashion to what Google has already done. 

Microsoft’s search engine is adding a “Fact Check” label to the search results “to help users find fact checking information on news, and with major stories and webpages within the Bing search results,” it said in a blog post

The label could be used on both news articles and web pages from fact-checking organisations, such as Snopes or PolitiFact, to quickly identify whether the claim is true or false. 

See this example provided by Bing on a hoax about Florida Governor Rick Scott’s critical condition after Hurricane Irma: 

Image: bing

Bing may apply the label on various subjects, such as news, health, science, and politics. 

In April, Google launched a similar feature on Search and News — a “Fact Check” tag which appears in Google search results and which tells users whether a certain claim is being fact-checked by Politifact and Snopes. 

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How to watch the Microsoft Build keynotes

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

Image: lili sams / mashable

Microsoft will soon kick off the beginning of developer conference season with its event: Build. In addition to annual updates on the performance of Windows, Office and the Surface devices, Microsoft is expected to comment on a new Windows design language, codenamed “Project Neon” and share updates to the company’s AI research

The keynotes will feature CEO Satya Nadella, EVP Scott Guthrie, EVP Harry Shum and EVP Terry Myerson across two events on Wednesday and Thursday.

The keynotes will kick off at 8 a.m. PT Wednesday and 8:30am PT Thursday when the company’s execs will take the stage at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. Here’s how to follow along: 

You can watch Microsoft’s official livestream here.

  • Mashable‘s Lance Ulanoff and Karissa Bell will be sharing updates live before, after and during the event.

  • You can follow them on our Twitter account @MashableTech and our Facebook Pages at Mashable and Mashable Tech.

We’re also expecting to hear more about Hololens, Bing bots and Cortana and hopefully some fun surprise hardware announcements. Stay tuned!

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Microsoft’s Bing wants you to chat with search results

Microsoft is testing developer tools that allow chatbots directly in Bing’s search results. Reports of the tests in Seattle and surrounding areas have been around for at least a month. The bots are powered by Skype.

Image: microsoft

The bots are currently limited to a handful of locations. Searching for a participating location reveals an option to ask the bot for help directly in the browser, as with El Gaucho (pictured above). The bots can answer basic queries about the location’s parking info, hours, and more via both buttons as well as natural language input. 

The conference schedule for Build, the company’s upcoming developer conference, also features a session that mentions “you can add your custom bots to Bing,” The Verge pointed out. Sources familiar with the company told The Verge that Microsoft is ready to further expand the feature.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has articulated the company’s focus on bots. Previous attempts include Tay, an experimental Twitter conversation bot that quickly turned racist, Xiaoice, which the company calls “Cortana’s little sister,” and of course, Cortana, the company’s AI assistant.

Rolling chatbots out to Bing would be a huge expansion into one of the company’s largest consumer-facing products. Chatbots in search are an interesting idea as Microsoft continues to innovate and compete with Google, the dominant search engine. Both search engines have shifted to focus on delivering answers directly to search queries and adding something like chatbots could help that goal.

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Google and Microsoft’s Bing have joined forces to fight piracy

Hard time for web pirates.
Hard time for web pirates.

Image: Shutterstock / Lukasz Stefanski

Google and Microsoft’s Bing have teamed up to make it harder for people in the UK to find pirated films and music and illegally stream sport events. 

The tech giants have signed up to a voluntary code of practice with the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) and Motion Picture Association aimed at ensuring offending websites are demoted in their search results. 

The code, described as a world’s first, means that UK netizens looking for music, film or live football content online will be guided toward legit providers instead of pirate sites. 

In a statement, the government’s Intellectual Property Office, which helped broker the code, called it a “landmark agreement” and a “first-of-its-kind initiative” to crack down on illegal piracy. 

However, Google sought to play down the significance of the agreement.

“Google has been an active partner for many years in the fight against piracy online,” said a Google spokesperson. “We remain committed to tackling this issue and look forward to further partnership with rights holders.”

A source familiar with the issue said there will be no policy changes at Google as a result of the code. Google believes they have already put in place sufficient measures to tackle piracy. 

The company already removes specific page links from its search results that may infringe copyright.