All posts in “Chelsea Clinton”

Nurx raises $36 million and adds Chelsea Clinton to its board of directors

Telemedicine startup Nurx recently closed a $36 million funding round led by Kleiner Perkins. As part of the investment, Kleiner Perkins General Partner Noah Knauf is joining the startup’s board of directors, along with and Chelsea Clinton .

With this new funding, CEO and co-founder Hans Gangeskar told TechCrunch that the startup plans to scale its clinical teams, pharmacies and geographic reach in the coming year.

“We have a new site in Miami where we have a team of nurses being on-boarded, [we’re] building out our engineering and design teams and really just [working to] increase the pace of everything that we’re doing” Gangeskar said.

The startup launched in 2014 with the goal to make reliable access to contraceptives as easy as opening your web browser. After plugging your information into its online app, users are connected with physicians, given a prescription and Nurx prepares their product for delivery.

Since its launch, this California-based startup now operates in 17 states, and has expanded its products to include not only contraceptives (such as pills, patches, injectables and products like Nuva Ring) but the anti-HIV medication PrEP as well. Gangesker says the company is also preparing to launch an at-home lab kit soon for HIV testing.

For Gangeskar, creating affordable access to contraceptives is a first step to changing how patients interact and receive medication from their physicians.

“Birth control is one of the fundamental functions of any health care system [so] for us its a natural place to start,” said Gangeskar.

To help advance its plans to redefine this space, Gangeskar says Nurx is excited to welcome public health veteran Chelsea Clinton to its board.

“Her experience in public health and global health from the Clinton Global Initiative has been really valuable, [particularly learning about] rolling out preventative services in large scales, because really that’s the potential of our platform — [to reach] populations that can’t be reached by the conventional medical system.”

While Washington looks to make cuts to American’s health care access, startups like Nurx offer a fresh perspective on this critical space.

Chelsea Clinton and Kellyanne Conway just had a friendly Twitter moment. Seriously.

Chelsea Clinton defended Kellyanne Conway after a Democratic lawmakers made lewd remarks about the Trump adviser.
Chelsea Clinton defended Kellyanne Conway after a Democratic lawmakers made lewd remarks about the Trump adviser.

Image: Minchillo/AP/REX/Shutterstock

Chelsea Clinton did possibly the most unlikely thing ever and came to the defense of Kellyanne Conway on Twitter on Friday.

It all happened after Conway was at the center of lewd remarks by Democratic Rep. Cedric Richmond of Louisiana. Richmond’s words drew outrage on Twitter and from politicians such as his own state’s governor, John Bel Edwards, who said “without question” Richmond should apologize. 

The controversial, some would say sexually suggestive language came during a fundraiser dinner with the Washington Press Club Foundation, during which Richmond attempted some sort of joke.

Referring to the photo of Conway kneeling on a couch in the Oval Office, he said this: 

“You even mentioned Kellyanne and the picture on the sofa. But I really just want to know what was going on there, because, I won’t tell anybody. And you can just explain to me that — that circumstance, because she really looked kind of familiar there in that position there. But don’t answer. And I don’t want you to refer back to the ’90s.”

Noting things like the position she was sitting in and even that cringe-worthy reference to “the ’90s” was enough to leave Clinton calling the whole thing “despicable” on Twitter. She said the Louisiana lawmaker should apologize to Conway, a statement that even took her back a bit.

Conway didn’t let that tweet slip by without throwing a little love back. The two political foes shared a warmer Twitter moment than usual, when Conway tweeted what appeared to be a pretty sincere thank you.

On Thursday, Richmond released a statement trying to explain his controversial comments, not really saying sorry but just saying his words were misunderstood.

“Since some people have interpreted my joke to mean something that it didn’t I think it is important to clarify what I meant, ” he wrote.  “Where I grew up, saying that someone is looking or acting ‘familiar’ simply means that they are behaving too comfortably.”

Well, that explanation just didn’t do it. And the Twitter-verse wasn’t having it.

And, of course, plenty of people trolled Richmond’s past tweets to get the point across.

And some were just happy Clinton took him to task.

The Chelsea Clinton guide to taking down Trump on Twitter

Let me put it to you like this.
Let me put it to you like this.

Image: Harnik/AP/REX/Shutterstock

While Hillary Clinton lays relatively low and Michelle Obama kicks back in an island paradise, Chelsea Clinton has become a relentless, vocal critic of President Trump and his policies. 

With a signature mix of mild sarcasm and exasperation, she routinely serves up sharp commentary on the 45th president to her 1.5 million followers on Twitter. 

Clinton, like both of her parents, must carefully balance her resistance against the risk of appearing like a so-called sore loser. Indeed, #MAGA supporters love taunting Clinton with reminders of her mother’s defeat. If the trolling irks or intimidates Clinton, it doesn’t show. 

Instead of getting embroiled in Twitter fights with egg avatars, Clinton focuses on her targets for the day, like fighting the refugee and Muslim ban, answering the global gag rule executive order with scientific research and writing the verbal equivalent of a face-palm response to Trump’s incoherent speech at a Black History Month gathering. 

On Thursday, following Trump’s bizarre press conference, Clinton helpfully supplied him with an answer to a question about rising anti-Semitism after he struggled with it for the second day in a row. “One would think he would have thought of an answer since yesterday,” she said. “Here’s one: There’s no place for any bigotry, ever, in America.” 

This is new territory for Clinton. Even though she campaign for her mom, her tweets were typically mild, with stories on global health, scientific research and child development prior to the inauguration. Maybe she was, like her mom and the Obamas, trying to respect a peaceful transfer of power, or felt some deference toward her friend, and the president’s daughter, Ivanka Trump. Whatever held her back, however, doesn’t seem to matter anymore. 

Here’s how she’s pulling off the high-wire act: 

1. The rhetorical question is your friend. 

Clinton doesn’t need lengthy threads or tweets that push the 140-character max. She instead tends toward pithy questions that make a dramatic point about Trump’s behavior and decision-making. 

Image: Chelsea Clinton / Twitter

Image: chelsea clinton / twitter

2. A little sarcasm goes a long way. 

Clinton knows how to lean into sarcasm and irony without leaning so hard that she looks bitter or humorless. 

Image: chelsea clinton / twitter

Image: chelsea clinton / twitter

3. Take on Trump’s actions and policies, not just him. 

Clinton rarely says Trump’s name. Instead, she includes tweet links that do mention his name or explain the impact of his policies, and builds her commentary on that.  

Image: Chelsea clinton / twitter

Image: Chelsea Clinton / Twitter

4. Smart retweets. 

Clinton’s retweet game is strong. She clearly carefully chooses which voices to amplify with her sizable platform. 

Image: twitter

Image: Twitter

5. Tweet about good people. 

Clinton’s Twitter feed would be pretty bleak if it only took on Trump and his administration. Instead, she utilizes the value of good counter-programming, particularly when it involves good people inspiring others, and doing the right thing. 

Clinton is only three weeks into challenging Trump and his administration. In that short time, though, she’s becoming what Hillary Clinton and Michelle Obama can’t be yet: a woman who doesn’t hold office but possesses both political power and the ability to speak forcefully about threats to American democracy.