All posts in “Git”

GitLab raises $20M Series C round led by GV


GitLab, a collaboration and DevOps platform for developers that’s currently in use by more than 100,000 organizations, today announced that it has raised a $20 million Series C round led by GV (the fund you may still remember under its former name of Google Ventures). This brings GitLab’s total funding to date to just over $45.5 million.

In addition to the new funding, the company also today said that WordPress founder Matt Mullenweg is joining the company’s board.

As its name implies, GitLab started out as a git-based open source tool for self-hosting code repositories. Since its launch in 2014, the company has branched out, though, and added a number of more DevOps-centric services to its lineup. This includes a number of workflow tools, but also features that easily enable code review/test/release automation and even application monitoring.

It’s maybe no surprise then that the company now sees it as its mission to “develop a seamless, integrated product for modern software developers and become the application for software development in Kubernetes” (yes — even GitLab now wants to get deeper into the Kubernetes game).

“The Fortune 500 is racing to build world-class software development organizations that mirror the speed, productivity, and quality of the largest tech companies. As these organizations strive to produce high-quality code at scale, they will need best-in-class tools and platforms. GitLab’s platform accelerates the development process with an emphasis on collaboration and automation,” said Dave Munichiello, GV General Partner, in a canned statement today. “GitLab’s hybrid, multi-cloud solution is loved by developers, and is seeing tremendous traction in the field.”

Current GitLab users include the likes of Ticketmaster, ING, NASDAQ, Sony, VMWare and Intel.

As for the funding itself, GitLab says that it plans to use it to add “new functionality for packaging, releasing, configuring and monitoring software.”

The company does face competition from the likes of GitHub and Atlassian’s BitBucket, though GitLab argues that its tools currently represent two-thirds of the self-hosted git market.

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Codota raises $2M from Khosla as autocomplete for developers


In recent years, GitHub has fundamentally changed developer workflows. By centralizing code on an easily accessible platform, the company was able to rapidly change the way people code. Following in these footsteps, Israeli startup Codota wants to further optimize workflows for the often neglected developer community — this time with machine intelligence. The company is announcing a $2 million seed round from Khosla Ventures for its autocomplete tool that helps engineers push better code in less time.

Codota interfaces with integrated development environments like Eclipse, expanding on intelligent code completion. Instead of just offering up brief suggestions of intended code, Codota can recommend larger chunks.

Co-founders Dror Weiss and Eran Yahav took advantage of open source code on the internet from GitHub and StackOverflow to build Codota. All of this public code was fed into machine learning models to enable them to recognize higher-level meaning across blocks of code.

The Codota team at its Tel Aviv headquarters

Programing languages share a lot of structural similarities with their distant spoken cousins. Words can be arranged in infinitely many ways to express a single thought or sentiment. Likewise, the same command can be represented in code in a number of ways. This is why it’s so critical that Codota understands the macro picture of what code is doing.

Of course natural language and code are not completely analogous. The team explained in an interview that in natural language processing, meaning is determined by looking at nearby words. Programs are more structured and meaning isn’t always strongly correlated with locality. So instead of just training on text, Codota also focused on the behaviors of a program.

Aside from improving speed and accuracy, Codota can help with discovery and education. Because Codota has been trained on millions of API implementations, it can help offer up best practices to developers. When open side-by-side with an IDE, the tool can highlight irregularities and demonstrate better ways to write code, lessons often pulled straight from the original creators of libraries.

The startup makes its money by allowing enterprises to keep their internal code private while benefitting from Codota’s insights. Right now the tool is limited to Java, but in the future additional languages will be added.

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