All posts in “iPhone”

Apple is reportedly predicting the larger ‘iPhone X Plus’ will be a runaway hit

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Apple is expected to release three iPhones in the same style as the iPhone X later this year, and one of them is expected to rise from the pack, literally and figuratively.

The Bell, a Korean news source, is reporting that the largest model, which is expected to have a 6.5-inch OLED screen, will be the most popular.

Apple is forecasting 70 million OLED panels for the new models, according to the report, with about 45 million for the larger 6.5-inch model, and 25 million for the 5.8-inch model (the same size as the current iPhone X). 

These forecasts likely just for the initial quarter for the new iPhones go on sale (Apple typically sells about 75 million iPhones in the first quarter they’re available). For subsequent quarters, Apple will certainly re-evaluate the “mix” based on actual sales.

The trick behind the iPhone X is that the phone itself is virtually the same size as an iPhone 8, except the front is all display (apart from a notch up top to make room for the camera, earpiece, and other sensors). 

Image: lili sams/mashable

For 2018, Apple is also said to be planning a more affordable iPhone, with a similar design to the iPhone X, but with an LCD screen instead of an OLED (the size is predicted to be 6 inches). Similar to how the iPhone X didn’t ship until October, either LCD model or the OLED models might have a staggered release, with a month between releases. The LCD phone is expected should to be priced more in line with the iPhone 8 and not the exorbitant  $1,000+ price point of the iPhone X. It’s also supposed to have a refreshed design and better hardware.

This will not be the last report as we gear up to the inevitable 2018 iPhone lineup unveiling, but it seems for now that the larger model will be the star of the show.

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Apple slapped with $6.6M fine in Australia over bricked devices

Apple has been fined AUS$9M (~$6.6M) by a court in Australia following a legal challenge by a consumer rights group related to the company’s response after iOS updates bricked devices that had been repaired by third parties.

The Australian Competitor and Consumer Commission (ACCC) invested a series of complaints relating to an error (‘error 53’) which disabled some iPhones and iPads after owners downloaded an update to Apple’s iOS operating system.

The ACCC says Apple admitted that, between February 2015 and February 2016 — via the Apple US’ website, Apple Australia’s staff in-store and customer service phone calls — it had informed at least 275 Australian customers affected by error 53 that they were no longer eligible for a remedy if their device had been repaired by a third party.

Image credit: 70023venus2009 via Flickr under license CC BY-ND 2.0

The court judged Apple’s action to have breached the Australian consumer law.

“If a product is faulty, customers are legally entitled to a repair or a replacement under the Australian Consumer Law, and sometimes even a refund. Apple’s representations led customers to believe they’d be denied a remedy for their faulty device because they used a third party repairer,” said ACCC commissioner Sarah Court in a statement.

“The Court declared the mere fact that an iPhone or iPad had been repaired by someone other than Apple did not, and could not, result in the consumer guarantees ceasing to apply, or the consumer’s right to a remedy being extinguished.”

The ACCC notes that after it notified Apple about its investigation, the company implemented an outreach program to compensate individual consumers whose devices were made inoperable by error 53. It says this outreach program was extended to approximately 5,000 consumers.

It also says Apple Australia offered a court enforceable undertaking to improve staff training, audit information about warranties and Australian Consumer Law on its website, and improve its systems and procedures to ensure future compliance with the law.

The ACCC further notes that a concern addressed by the undertaking is that Apple was allegedly providing refurbished goods as replacements, after supplying a good which suffered a major failure — saying Apple has committed to provide new replacements in those circumstances if the consumer requests one.

“If people buy an iPhone or iPad from Apple and it suffers a major failure, they are entitled to a refund. If customers would prefer a replacement, they are entitled to a new device as opposed to refurbished, if one is available,” said Court.

The court also held the Apple parent company, Apple US, responsible for the conduct of its Australian subsidiary. “Global companies must ensure their returns policies are compliant with the Australian Consumer Law, or they will face ACCC action,” added Court.

We’ve reached out to Apple for comment on the court decision and will update this post with any response.

A company spokeswoman told Reuters it had had “very productive conversations with the ACCC about this” but declined to comment further on the court finding.

More recently, Apple found itself in hot water with consumer groups around the world over its use of a power management feature that throttled performance on older iPhones to avoid unexpected battery shutdowns.

The company apologized in December for not being more transparent about the feature, and later said it would add a control allowing consumers to turn it off if they did not want their device’s performance to be impacted.

Apple to add life-saving new feature in iOS 12

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Image: Apple

People who call 911 from their iPhone will be able to automatically share their exact location with first responders, Apple announced on Monday. 

The feature, which will only be available to users in the U.S. at launch, is slated to become available later this year with the launch of iOS 12. 

To enable this new feature, Apple is using its HELO (Hybridized Emergency Location) technology, launched in 2015, which estimates the caller’s location using a variety of sources, including cell towers as well as GPS and Wi-Fi access point data. Apple will also use technology from emergency technology company RapidSOS to share HELO location data with 911 centers. 

“When every moment counts, these tools will help first responders reach our customers when they most need assistance,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said in a statement. 

This data will only be available to the 911 center responding to the call; it cannot be used for any non-emergency purpose, Apple said. 

RapidSOS already has an iOS app called RapidSOS Beacon with similar functionality. However, in iOS 12 this will be built right into the operating system itself. 

Apple’s iOS 12 (officially announced during the company’s WWDC conference in early June) will likely launch in September, alongside the likely launch of Apple’s new iPhones. 

It brings a number of improvements, including better performance, group notifications, reports on how you’re using the device, the ability to set usage limits for apps, Siri shortcuts, group FaceTime, new Animoji and more. 

The update will be available to iPhone 5S, iPhone SE, iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, iPhone 6S and 6S Plus, iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, iPhone 8 and 8 Plus, and iPhone X.

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