All posts in “iPhone”

How to put old photos in your social media stories

You can add old photos to your social media stories.
You can add old photos to your social media stories.

Image: lili sams/mashable

Stories started with Snapchat, then Instagram and Facebook added their own versions to try and win our loyalty. 

There are crazy amounts of ways to make your story unique within each app. But you might not know that you can also post old photos in your current stories.

Here’s how to put photos you’ve already taken in your stories on Snapchat, Instagram, and Facebook. Just note that your followers might get a little annoyed if you do it too much.

Snapchat 

Access Snapchat and camera roll photos at the bottom of your screen.

Access Snapchat and camera roll photos at the bottom of your screen.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

Open up Snapchat and you’ll see a little bubble on your screen directly underneath the circle button to snap a new photo. Click that and you’ll see a screen with photos you’ve saved on Snapchat and from your camera roll. 

Hit "Edit and Send" (which is covered by this caption) to jazz up your photo.

Hit “Edit and Send” (which is covered by this caption) to jazz up your photo.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

Scroll through either feed until you find the old photo you want to post. After you pick one, there will be an option asking if you’d like to edit the photo before sending. This will bring up all of the editing options you normally see on Snapchat. 

Photos from your camera roll appear with a white border around them.

Photos from your camera roll appear with a white border around them.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

When it’s all ready to roll, click the blue arrow button to send to your story or any of your friends. It’s worth noting that photos pulled from Snapchat will look normal, but the ones taken from your camera roll will appear with a white border and say they’re from your camera roll. In other words, people will be well aware of the fact that you’re posting an old photo. If that doesn’t bother you, everything’s good to go. 

Instagram

Instagram works somewhat similarly. However, you can only post photos that you’ve saved to your camera roll in the last 24 hours. So, if you want to post a photo from last week you’re going to have to re-save it. 

Add photos from your camera roll to your Instagram story.

Add photos from your camera roll to your Instagram story.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

To get started, hit the camera button in the upper lefthand of the app or just hit your face icon by the rest of the stories. Choose the box next to the flash icon on the screen to see your photos. 

Camera roll photos get cropped in your story.

Camera roll photos get cropped in your story.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

Pick a photo and it’ll appear on your screen, ready to be edited. A slight downfall is that you don’t have a say in how it’s displayed. The photo will fit to the screen, so parts of it might get cut off. In the example used above, Instagram cut off a fourth person that was standing to the left of me. However, you can still edit it just like any other Instagram story. Do that and hit “Your Story” and it’ll show up in your story for the next 24 hours. 

Facebook

Once again, Facebook is similar to the other two, with slight differences. 

Add old photos to your Facebook story.

Add old photos to your Facebook story.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

Hit your icon at the top of your Facebook mobile app to create a story. Then tap the little square button on the far right of the screen. It will bring photos from your camera roll to the bottom of the screen so you can scroll through to find the one you want. 

Posting old photos to your Facebook story only takes a minute.

Posting old photos to your Facebook story only takes a minute.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

All of the editing options will pop up after you select a photo. Add any stickers or filters you want, then hit “Your Story” to make it live. You’ll confirm by clicking “Add” and your old photo will appear on your Facebook. And no one will be able to tell it’s not a photo you just took. 

Now you know how to post old photos to your social media stories, so start sharing some of your best memories.

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This rollable, waterproof keyboard fits in your beach bag

Make the beach your office.
Make the beach your office.

Image: Sungwoo

Summer can be the best time of year to take your work on the road—or at least to the nearest pool.

But, getting a little work done out of office can be tricky, since most laptops we know of aren’t sand-and-margarita proof. And doing any serious typing on a portable touchscreen device is a total pain. 

That’s the beauty of the Sungwoo Foldable Silicone Keyboard. It’s perfect for your tablet, phone, or sub-notebook — and when you’re done with it, it rolls up like a towel and fits neatly in your beach bag (or wherever else you want to stow it.)

It connects with a USB cord (so you might need an adapter for some newer-model Apple products) and it’s pretty rugged: if it gets sandy, all you need to do is wipe it down.

It’s usually $20, but you can get it here for only $12.78—or 30 percent off.  Buy it here.

Apple could guide you around your city using augmented reality


ARKit is one of the biggest changes in iOS 11. Under the hood, Apple is about to transform the iPhone into a very capable augmented reality device. Felix Lapalme‏ has been looking at assets in the Maps app package to find out if the company is going to leverage augmented reality for turn-by-turn directions.

On July 22nd, he dug around a beta version of iOS 11 and found this mysterious 3D arrow for the Maps app:

You might think that Apple is going to use this arrow for traditional turn-by-turn directions on top of a map like in traditional navigation apps. But some code tells you to tilt your phone in front of your face when you’re using walking directions.

In addition to that, it looks like the Maps app is going to use your phone cameras. That’s a lot of smoke for a feature that could ship with the iPhone 8. And when there’s smoke, Apple hides it:

You might remember Google’s Project Tango. Among other things, Google promised to use augmented reality to provide turn-by-turn directions inside museums, malls and more.

Apple already announced that it plans to add detailed maps of airports and malls in iOS 11. iOS 11 and the next iPhone are shipping in September. So I wouldn’t be surprised if Apple talked about some feature that lets you walk around an airport to find the nearest coffee shop using augmented reality. It would look like this app developed by Andrew Hart‏, a developer who has been playing around with new frameworks:

LinkedIn is rolling out video creation on its mobile app

You can start creating videos within your LinkedIn mobile app.
You can start creating videos within your LinkedIn mobile app.

Image: Carl court/Getty Images

LinkedIn wants to let users share as much as possible on the site. So in its latest effort the social media company is rolling out a video creation tool within its mobile app

The feature is only available for frequent contributors at the moment, but will be available to everyone else soon.

“Some stories are better shown than told. Video allows you to evoke emotion, transport viewers, teach something or share some incredible piece of insight when words and images alone aren’t enough,” LinkedIn wrote in the announcement email. “We can’t wait to see how you use this new way to tell your stories on LinkedIn.” 

Start creating videos on LinkedIn.

Start creating videos on LinkedIn.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

For users with access to the feature, you can find a little movie recording icon just to the left of the camera icon that has always been there. Click that, give LinkedIn access to your phone’s microphone, and start recording. When you’re done, just hit “Next” and the video will show up as an attachment in a new post. 

LinkedIn recommends creating videos for work hacks that will increase your productivity, front row seats at a conference, an insider’s perspective on the day’s new, or whatever else you think your professional network might like. 

Before this update, users could attach videos saved in their photo library. But there was no option to create your own video on the spot within the app itself.

So make sure you have the latest version of LinkedIn installed on your smartphone, and start thinking up some clever video ideas to share with your friends and colleagues.

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Android phones could swipe the iPhone 8’s most important new feature

Android phones could soon have the same 3D sensing power we're expecting from the iPhone 8.
Android phones could soon have the same 3D sensing power we’re expecting from the iPhone 8.

Image: raymond wong/mashable

Android phones sometimes follow Apple’s lead when it comes to key functionality features, and the next generation of smartphones could be no different. Future Android devices are expected to mimic one of the upcoming iPhone 8‘s most anticipated new features: 3D facial scanning

Qualcomm’s next generation of Snapdragon chips, which will be announced at the end of the year, will have greatly improved, new image signal processors (ISP) and will likely enable even better depth-sensing capabilities for smartphone cameras, according to a report from CNET.  

That new processing power could potentially allow phones with the highest-tier Qualcomm chips — which in the current generation of devices include the flagships from OnePlus, Samsung, and HTC — to offer the same 3D facial sensing feature expected to replace Touch ID in the iPhone 8 as its go-to biometric security feature. 

The new 3D scanning capability will ostensibly change the way we interact with our phones yet again, like when the iPhone 5S introduced Touch ID in 2013 and other phonemakers adopted it to follow suit. So Android devices will probably want to adopt the tech as soon as possible to stay competitive. 

The new Qualcomm chipset will reportedly use infrared light sensors, which would likely be attached to a smartphone’s camera module, to “measure depth and render high-resolution depth maps for facial recognition, 3D reconstruction of objects and mapping.” Biometric security features would be one of the most obvious uses for the functionality, although it could also be harnessed for other things, like VR.

You can check out a demo of Qualcomm’s 3D mapping and image reconstruction tech in the video below, but there’s no footage of the biometric feature described in the CNET report. 

[embedded content]

The chips could also help to improve Android cameras, which for many, specifically ex-Google SVP of Social Vic Gundotra, lag behind Apple’s latest dual lens setup in the iPhone 7 Plus. 

The iPhone 8’s 3D facial sensors (and everything else about the phone) haven’t been confirmed yet, so it might be premature to call the feature the future of smartphone security. The rumor mill is strong however, and Qualcomm is ready to stake its own claim in the functionality — so you shouldn’t be surprised if we’re all unlocking our new phones with our faces by this time next year. 

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