All posts in “Legend Of Zelda”

Grab the gray Nintendo Switch Joy-Con controllers for $12 off

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Plus save $10.05 on "Mario Kart Deluxe 8" and "Super Smash Bros. Ultimate."
Plus save $10.05 on “Mario Kart Deluxe 8” and “Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.”

Image: nintendo

TL;DR: The gray Nintendo Switch Joy-Con controllers match any case and are on sale for $66.99 at Walmart, saving you $12.01.


The ability to play the Switch on the go with portable joy-cons is sweet, but those things are about as easy to lose as AirPods.

If you’re in need of a replacement pair, Walmart has the gray set (obviously the best-looking ones) on sale for $66.99. That’s only $12.01 off the original price, but we’ll take any discount we can find on Switch accessories.

Most everyone who has a Switch has the bigger Pro controllers, but the convenience of the OG Joy-Cons is still so important. With the ability to play in handheld mode or detach them to play with a friend, you’re guaranteed to never be bored.

The Switch’s ability to stream via Hulu also makes it a great tablet alternative for people who don’t need to buy an actual tablet.

Walmart has a few other sweet Switch discounts, including $10.05 off Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.

Regularly $79, you can save $12.01 (nearly 15%) and get the pair of gray Joy-Cons for $66.99.

Nintendo makes the old new again with Mario, Zelda, Tetris titles for Switch

The afternoon brought an eventful series of announcements from Nintendo in one of its Direct video promos, and 2019 is looking to be a banner year for the Switch. Here’s everything the company announced, from Super Mario Maker 2 to the unexpected remake of Game Boy classic Link’s Awakening.

The stream cold opened with a look at the new Mario Maker, which would honestly be enough announcement for one day. But boy did they have more up their sleeves.

First the actually new stuff:

Shown last but likely to garner the bulk of the internet’s response is the remake of Link’s Awakening, which came out more than a quarter of a century ago on Game Boy. I admit to never finishing this but I loved the feel of it, so I’m dying to play this new tilt-shifted, perspective-switching 3D version.

Platinum has an intriguing new game called Astral Chain, in which you appear to control two fighters at the same time in some crazy-looking robot(?)-on-robot action. Talent from The Wonderful 101, Bayonetta, and Nier: Automata ensure this will be worth keeping an eye on.

The recent trend of battle royale and perhaps the best game ever made, Tetris, combine in Tetris 99, where 100 people simultaneously and competitively drop blocks. It looks bonkers, and it’s free on Switch starting right now.

And on the JRPG tip:

Fire Emblem: Three Houses got a long spot that introduced the main characters, whom you’ll no doubt ally with and/or be betrayed by. Romance is in the air! And arrows.

From the back-to-basics studio that put out I Am Setsuna and Lost Sphear comes Oninaki, an action RPG that looks like a good well-crafted bit of fun, if not particularly original.

Dragon Quest 11 S — an enhanced version of the original hit — and DQ Builders 2 are on their way to Switch later this year, in Fall and July respectively.

Rune Factory 4 Special is another enhanced, remastered classic in a series that I adore (though I wish they’d remaster Frontier). It was also announced that RF5 is in development, so thank god for that.

Final Fantasy VII is coming at the end of March, and Final Fantasy IX is available now. I’m ashamed to say I never played the latter but this is a great opportunity to.

Sidescrollers new and old:

BOXBOY! + BOXGIRL! is a new entry in a well-like puzzle platformer series that introduces some new characters and multiplayer. Coming in April.

Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night got a teaser, but we’ve heard a lot about this Castlevania spiritual sequel already. Just come out!

Yoshi’s Crafted World comes out March 29, but there’s a demo available today.

Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker gets an update adding multiplayer to its intricate levels and soon, a paid pack for new ones. I might wait for a combined version but this should be fun.

Miscellaneous but still interesting:

The new Marvel Ultimate Alliance is coming this summer and I can’t wait. The second one was a blast but it came out way too long ago. A good co-op brawler is a natural fit for the Switch, plus being a superhero is fun.

Daemon X Machina, the striking-looking mech combat game, is getting a demo ahead of the summer release. They’re going to incorporate changes and advice from players so if you want to help shape the game, get to it.

Disney Tsum Tsum Festival… I don’t know what this is. But it looks wild.

Deltarune! It’s the sequel-ish to the beloved Undertale, and you can get the first chapter on Switch now. Play Undertale first, or you won’t get the dog jokes.

There were a few more little items here and there but that’s the gist. Boy am I glad I have a Switch!

You can watch the full Direct here.

Nintendo’s ‘souped-up’ NES Zelda loads you with gear for an easier adventure

Nintendo has set a strange new precedent with the release of Legend of Zelda SP on the Switch: it’s essentially the original NES game but Link starts loaded up with good gear and cash. In a way it’s no different from a cheat code, but the way it’s executed feels like a missed opportunity.

The game itself (SP stands for “special”) is described by Nintendo in the menu as a “souped up version” of the original: “Living the life of luxury!” It’s a separate entry in the menu with all the other NES games you get as part of the company’s subscription service.

You’re given the white sword, big shield, blue ring, and power bracelet, plus 255 rupees to replace that shield when a Like-like eats it. Basically they’ve given you all the stuff you can find on the overworld (including max bombs and keys), but no items you’d get from inside a dungeon. You also have six hearts, and traveling around a little bit I determined these were awarded by raiding nearby hidden areas, not simply assigned. Secret passages are already revealed, and so on.

Because it skips the title screen and save game selection it seems like someone must have essentially played through the game to this point (or more likely edited the values in game RAM) and then walked to the classic starting point and made a save state that automatically loads when you start or reset the game. This means the only way to save is to use the Switch’s built-in save states, not the rather inconvenient save method the game used.

It’s plain enough that this will be a less frustrating way to explore this famously difficult game, but it seems untrue to Zelda’s roots. I understand perhaps gifting the player some of the impossible to find things like a heart hidden inside a random block here or there. Getting some bombs to start is great too, and maybe even the rings (warping is helpful, and the game is pretty punishing so damage reduction is nice). But the white sword?

For one thing, a player experiencing the game this way misses out on one of the most iconic moments in all gaming — “It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this!” Then the ritual lifting of the wooden sword. And then setting out into the world to die again and again.

And for me, the white sword was always sort of a rite of passage in the game — your first big step towards becoming powerful. You earned it by finding those extra heart containers, perhaps after asking in vain after it before you were ready. Once you have it, you’re cutting through enemies like butter.

To make it the default sword and to skip these steps seems like it causes the player to miss out on what makes Zelda Zelda.

To be fair, it’s not the only version of the game you can play — the original is available too. But it seems like a missed opportunity. Why not just have a save game you can load with this stuff, so you can continue playing as normal? Why not have the option baked into the launch of the original Zelda — have a couple secret save states ready with differing levels of items?

Nintendo has the opportunity to introduce a new generation to classic NES games here, having provided a rather barebones experience with the NES Classic Edition. Why not enhance them? Include the manual, god mode, developer commentary? This is the legacy the company has been stewarding for decades, and what better than to give it the respect it deserves?

I’m probably overthinking it. But this Zelda SP just seems like a rushed job when players would appreciate something like it, just not so heavy-handed. It’s not that these games are inviolable, but that if they’re going to be fiddled with, we’d like to see it done properly.

Nintendo is planning a Legend of Zelda mobile game


Following up on the massive success of Pokémon GO and the, well, slightly less massive success of Super Mario Run, Nintendo is reportedly planning a Legend of Zelda for smartphones for release later this year, or so The Wall St Journal’s sources have it.

Details beyond that are scarce; it would supposedly follow the release of the also-rumored Animal Crossing mobile game, presumably once everyone has played that into the ground.

How exactly they expect to represent the expansive exploring, puzzling and battling that have defined the series heretofore is unclear. Super Mario Run took a minimalist approach to controls, essentially reducing the platformer to a one-button game.

That would be rather difficult with the vastly more complex Zelda series — doubly so considering the improbably well-received Breath of the Wild was so vast and unrestricted. Whether the company would repeat its pricing strategy for Mario is also unknown; sales weren’t quite what it had hoped.

We’ll likely know more soon; Super Mario Run was announced three months ahead of its release. But if the timing hinted at by the WSJ’s sources is correct, we’ll hear about the Animal Crossing game first, though who knows when.

Nintendo fixes a typo on the original ‘Zelda’ after 30 years

It took them 29 and a half years, several consoles and two revisions but finally Nintendo has fixed a typo on The Legend of Zelda.

The letter “N” sneaked into the English translation of the fantasy video game in 1987, when the hint man in Level 1 talks about an “eastmost penninsula”. 

As pointed out by Clyde Mandellin, author of the book Legends of Localization Book 1: The Legend of Zelda, a few months ago Nintendo corrected the mistake after the release of miniature versions of the Famicom and NES Classic Edition. 

“Penninsula” wasn’t fixed even when Nintendo re-released Zelda in a collection for the Game Cube, and was a constant feature for the Wii, 3DS, Wii U Virtual Console. 

 Naturally, Zelda fans young and old weighed into the controversy with mixed views: 

You can have a look at all the recent changes to Zelda 1 here. 

Oh, and if you wonder what it actually says in Japanese, the literal translation is: “You can’t use arrows if you run out of money.”

Which totally makes sense considering that you get the bow in the very same dungeon.

Nobody knows why the “eastmost penninsula” snuck in. 

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