All posts in “nvidia”

Don’t expect a new Nvidia Shield Tablet anytime soon

The Shield TV, Nvidia’s Android TV streaming box, is still getting regular updates, but the Shield Tablet, which launched in 2014 was last refreshed in 2015 and officially discontinued last year, wasn’t quite the same success. As Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang said during a small press gathering at CES in Las Vegas today, the company doesn’t have any plans to resurrect it.

“Shield TV is still unquestionably the best Android TV in the world,” he said. “We have updated the software now over 30 times. People are blown away by how much we continue to enhance it.” And more (unspecified) enhancements are coming, he said.

On the mobile side, though, the days of the Shield Tablet are very much over, especially now that the Nintendo Switch, which uses Nvidia’s Tegra chips, has really capture that market.

“We are really committed to [Shield TV], but on mobile devices, we don’t think it’s necessary,” Huang said. “We would only build things not to gain market share. Nvidia is not a ‘take somebody else’s market share company.’ I think that’s really angry. It’s an angry way to run a business. Creating new markets, expanding the horizon, creating things that the world doesn’t have, that’s a loving way to build a business.”

He added that this is the way to inspire employees, too. Just copying competitors and maybe selling a product cheaper, though, does nothing to motivate employees and is not what Nvidia is interested in.

Of course, Huang left the door open to a future tablet if it made sense — though he clearly doesn’t think it does today. He’d only do so, “if the world needs it. But at the moment, I just don’t see it. I think Nintendo did such a great job.”


Bonus: The outspoken Huang also used his time with the assembled journalists to voice his opinion of AMD’s new Radeon VII graphics cards, which were announced earlier today. “Wow. Underwhelming, huh? I was kind of like saying ‘what?’ Because the performance is lousy and there’s nothing new. There’s no raytracing, no artificial intelligence. It’s a 7nm chip with HBM memory that barely keeps up with a 2080 and when we turn on DLSS, we’ll crush it. When we turn on raytracing, we’ll crush it. And it’s not even available yet.”

Acer’s launches new high-end gaming laptops with Nvidia RTX 2080 GPUs

Acer today announced two new gaming laptops at CES, the 17-inch $4,000 Predator Triton 900 with a convertible 4K display and the somewhat more affordable all-metal 15-inch $1,800 Triton 500. What sets these laptops apart is, among a few other interesting features and some interesting design choices, support for Nvidia’s new(ish) RTX 2080 GPUs, the most powerful graphics processors on the market today.

The Triton 900 features the RTX 2080 by default, while you’ll have to shell out an extra $700 to get it on the Triton 500. Otherwise, the specs are very much what you’d expect from a modern gaming laptop, with 8th generation Intel i7 chips, 16GB of base memory (with the option of going up to 32GB) and up to a terabyte of NVMe-based storage.

The Triton 900’s flipping screen is a bit of a gimmick, but it doesn’t look bad and the company argues that it’ll allow for “multiple gaming scenarios and better ergonomics.” I’m not sure ergonomics is top of mind for most gamers who are willing to shell out $4,000 for a laptop, but it can’t hurt either. The 4K display is a touchscreen, too, which could make it interesting as a more high-end portable workstation for creative work. If you’re a gamer, though, you’ll likely be more excited about the built-in Xbox wireless receiver and audio by Waves, which offers head tracking to provide you a more realistic 3D audio experience

Unsurprisingly, the Triton 500 is the more “sensible” option here, with a more palatable starting price, slim design (it’s 0.7 inches thick and weighs in at 4.6 lbs) and the promise of eight hours of battery life. You only get a full HD display, though, with even the base model comes with an RTX 2060 card, which is no slouch either and should easily be able to let you play and modern game at its maximum graphics settings in HD.

Watch Nvidia’s CES press conference live right here

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Nvidia is holding its CES press conference today at 8 PM Pacific, 11 PM Eastern. The company will talk about self-driving cars and all things GPUs. It’s a great way to see what’s ahead for Nvidia.

We’ll have a team on the ground, so you should also check out our full CES coverage.

HP releases a monster $5k, 65-inch gaming display

The HP Omen X Emperium is not meant to watch reruns of The Office. Though it can. This display is one of the first in Nvidia’s family of Big Format Gaming Displays. Unlike traditional large displays, these are certified by Nvidia and are said to deliver the best gaming experience through the smoothest motion.

This doesn’t come cheap. The Omen X Emperium is $5,000 and will be available in February.

Last summer Nvidia announced its intention to work with several manufacturers to produce these displays. This is one of the first to be announced and, though it costs significantly more than similar-size displays from traditional TV makers, a good chunk of gamers will likely spend the cash to gain the advantage offered by the incredible picture.

Inside the Emperium is an Nvidia chipset with Nvidia’s G-Sync HDR technology. This technology in the display syncs with an Nvidia GPU in a computer to ensure a proper refresh rate resulting in images that are sharper, more fluid and free of stutter.

The screen its utilizes HP’s fantastic Quantium Dot technology that is among the best available for desktop monitors. It even has a DCI-P3 95%, meaning it has the ability to display a massive amount of the color spectrum. The display packs a resolve rate of 144Hz — and since this display is more monitor than TV, I’m inclined to believe the claim.

Traditionally, large displays from Samsung, LG and others, often claim their displays have a fast refresh rate of 240Hz or higher. And that’s sort of true, but only because of software enhancements that can often make the image look terrible. I’ve yet to see this display in person, but I’m confident that its claims are legit.

Nvidia’s Shield TV software pack is built-into the display, giving the owner access to nearly every streaming service and a wide-range of games through Nvidia’s streaming service.

A soundbar is included with the display because good sound is nearly as important as good images.

These people aren’t real. Can you tell?

The image above looks like a collage of photographs, but in fact, it’s been generated by an artificial intelligence. And as real as they may look, the people in the image aren’t actual humans. 

In a new paper (via The Verge), a group of Nvidia’s researchers explain how they’ve created these images by employing a type of AI, called generative adversarial network (GAN), in novel ways. And their results are truly mind-boggling. 

The paper is titled “A Style-Based Generator Architecture for Generative Adversarial Networks” and signed by Tero Karras, Samuli Laine and Timo Aila, all from Nvidia. In it, the researchers show how they’ve redesigned the GAN’s architecture with a new approach called “style-based design.” 

“Our generator thinks of an image as a collection of “styles.” 

“The new architecture leads to an automatically learned, unsupervised separation of high-level attributes (e.g., pose and identity when trained on human faces) and stochastic variation in the generated images (e.g., freckles, hair),” the paper says. 

In layman’s terms, after being trained, the GAN produced images that are pretty much indistinguishable from photographs of real people, completely on its own. 

“Our generator thinks of an image as a collection of “styles,” where each style controls the effects at a particular scale,” the researchers explain in a video accompanying the paper. These styles are attributes such as pose, hair, face shape, eyes and facial features. And researchers can play with these styles and get different results, as seen in the video, below. 

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It’s not just people that GAN can create in this way. 

In the paper, the researchers use the GAN to create images of bedrooms, cars and cats. 

Image: Nvidia/Arxiv.org

Amazingly, the concept of GANs was introduced just four years ago by researchers from the University of Montreal. 

Check the image from that paper below to see how much progress has been made since then. 

Image: Universite de Montr EAL/arxiv.org 

It’s easy to see this technology used in the creation of realistic-looking images for marketing or advertising purposes, for example. But it’s just as easy to imagine someone using it to create fake “evidence” of events that never happened in order to promote some agenda. 

At the speed this tech is progressing, it soon might be impossible to tell whether you’re looking at a real photograph or a computer generated image. 

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