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All the people (and things) Trump actually thinks are racist

"I am not racist, but all these other things are!"
“I am not racist, but all these other things are!”

Image: David Becker/Getty Images

President Donald Trump has had an especially hard time convincing Americans he’s not racist this week.

What with blaming “many sides” and the “alt-left” after this weekend’s deadly violence in Charlottesville — despite white supremacists and neo-Nazis being at the heart of the protests against the removal of a Confederate statue — he’s making it pretty hard to believe otherwise. 

Trump received a great deal of backlash for refusing to directly condemn white supremacists, the KKK, and neo-Nazis until Monday, and that statement was undermined by his off-the-rails press conference a day later that once again blamed “both sides,” emboldening the KKK and white supremacists. 

Trump has yet to denounce the hate groups that brought fear into Charlottesville’s streets, beginning with a racist, torch-lit march Friday night, on Twitter, his messaging platform of choice. Holding back on Twitter insults seems pretty unlike Donny Boy.

In fact, after searching through the depths of the Trump Twitter Archive, it’s clear Trump has no problem publicly decrying things and people as racist — so long as they’re not Nazis or white supremacists.

Barack Obama

First black president? Must be racist. So racist that he warranted another tweet.

Touré

This man wrote Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness?: What It Means To Be Black Now, so that makes sense? Right? According to Trump, Touré’s a very boring racist responsible for racist coverage on MSNBC and has bad ratings.

Jon Stewart

Is John Stewart racist? Well that YouTube video doesn’t work, so we can’t really say.

Danny Zuker

Zuker seems to have referenced an example of Trump being racist … but maybe he’s actually the racist one.

Bryant Gumbel

Another black man Trump accuses of being racist … Trump also called him a talentless, really dumb, man with a “long and deep record of failure.” But to be clear, Trump doesn’t think Gumbel’s stories are racist — just him.

Anthony Weiner

What do you even say to that?

Football coaches

Come again?

Black-ish

Forget the fact that the show is about a black man trying to raise his family in today’s society with a strong sense of cultural identity, Trump feels the title is racist.

Django Unchained

You know, the movie about a freed slave…

The Maryland Democrat Party

K.

Macy’s

Yes, the department store.

Bill and Hillary Clinton

You saw that one coming.

Elizabeth Warren

Ugh.

Tavis Smiley

How many black men does this make, Trump?

Turn the tables

While the archive shows many accusations from Trump, it also shows some of the many who’ve called him racist. Over the years big names like David Letterman, Al Sharpton, Donny Deutsch, and Mitt Romney have called the president racist — but he continues to assure us all he is not.

This all makes a lot of sense. Really.

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Obama’s Charlottesville response just became most-liked tweet in history

Legend.
Legend.

Image: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Barack Obama may not be the president anymore but that’s not stopping him from making history.

In the wake of the deadly clash between neo-Nazi hate groups and protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend, President Donald Trump’s usually eager Twitter fingers remained inactive for hours  while Obama rose to the challenge of addressing the nation.

Now, just days after the former president responded to the tragic violence with a powerful Nelson Mandela quote, his tweet has become the most-liked in history.

The record-breaking tweet in the series of three includes an image of Obama smiling through a window at four children, accompanied by Mandela’s words, “No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion…”

The tweet quickly gained over 2 million likes by Tuesday afternoon, and on Wednesday a spokesperson from Twitter confirmed to Mashable it had become the second most liked tweet of all time.

Then on Tuesday night at approximately 10:07 p.m. ET, Obama’s tweet catapulted to the top of the Twitter totem, setting a new all-time record. The tweet netted an impressive 2,705,809 likes (and rising) at the time of writing. 

The second most-liked tweet now belongs to Ariana Grande, whose 2017 emotional message to fans after the deadly Manchester bombing attack at her concert received 2,703,448 likes. And of course, the third most-liked tweet in history goes to Ellen DeGeneres’ beloved Oscars selfie from 2014, with 2,418,912 likes.

But while Obama’s tweet may be the most liked, a Twitter spokesperson confirmed Tuesday it’s only the fifth most retweeted tweet ever —trailing behind Ariana Grande, Louis Tomlinson, Ellen DeGeneres, and of course, the infamous plea for Wendy’s chicken nuggets.

Still … not too shabby, right? What do you think, Trump?

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Obama responds to Charlottesville with one of the most liked tweets in history

Barack Obama, you are missed.
Barack Obama, you are missed.

Image: isaac Brekken/Getty Images for National Clean Energy Summit

After a “Unite the Right” white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, turned deadly on Saturday, former president Barack Obama reached out on Twitter to comfort Americans.

While President Trump was silent on the platform, refusing to address the violent clash between hate groups and protesters for hours, Obama shared a powerful message in the form of a Nelson Mandella quote about hate and the potential to love.

The first of Obama’s three tweets has since become the third most-liked tweet in history, according to Esquire

The tweet, which featured a photograph of Obama peering at young children through a window, began the quote: “No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin or his background or his religion…”

It quickly amassed over 2 million likes and 970,000 retweets, nearing other record-setting tweets like Ellen’s famous Oscars selfie, which got in impressive 2,419,012 likes back in 2014 and Ariana Grande’s 2017 tweet to fans after the deadly Manchester bombing attacks took place at one of her concerts. Grande’s emotional tweet currently holds the top spot on Twitter with 2,703,092 likes.

After his tweet, Obama then went on to finish the quote, writing “‘People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love. For love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.’ – Nelson Mandela.”

Obama was heavily praised for speaking up in wake of the tragic events that took place in Charlottesville, especially since Trump appeared reluctant to address the rally. Trump was criticized by notable political and cultural figures including Chelsea Clinton and J.K. Rowling. 

Eventually, he condemned violence “on many sides,” but didn’t explicitly call out white supremacists. 

Then, on Monday afternoon — two days after the fact — Trump gave an impromptu announcement to the press, while gazing deeply into his teleprompter. 

After bragging about the current strength of the economy, the president publicly addressed those at fault for the violence, condemning the racist actions of members of the KKK, neo-Nazis, and white supremacists.

Obama’s message just goes to show that quality of tweets is more valuable than quantity … take notes, Trump.

Mashable reached out to Twitter for additional comments.

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The North Korean elite use the internet just like we do, and we shouldn’t be surprised

A North Korean school boy at the Sci-tech Complex. A new report says that some North Koreans have very familiar online habits.
A North Korean school boy at the Sci-tech Complex. A new report says that some North Koreans have very familiar online habits.

Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock

The small slice of folks who sit atop North Korea’s sociopolitical hierarchy use the internet pretty much like anyone else in the world, according to a study published by Recorded Future on Wednesday. 

That might sound surprising, and indeed the report sparked a flurry of news stories on the topic. But it shouldn’t come as a shock, according to experts familiar with the region.

“It shouldn’t be a surprise that they like gaming and shopping at Amazon,” said Robert Manning, an Asia analyst with The Atlantic Council. “I think it’s not as weird a place as people think it is.”

The internet activity of North Koreans, as noted by Recorded Future, definitely supports that. 

North Koreans with access to the open internet — generally the members of the ruling family and those they trust, such as friends and staff members — do things you or I or really anyone else does on the internet. They read the news, mess around on Facebook, play some games, check email, and search for stuff on Amazon. They spend a ton of their time on the internet streaming stuff and gaming. Those two things combined make up 65 percent of North Korean internet activity. 

Those with internet access in North Korea are also fluent in United States culture and political discourse.

Those with internet access in North Korea are also fluent in United States culture and political discourse, according to Michael Madden, who runs North Korea Leadership Watch. They watch American pundits and read The New York Times and other international news outlets.

“North Koreans are not nearly as hermetically sealed as we make them out to be, and North Koreans are not nearly as hermetically sealed as they make themselves out to be,” Madden said. 

The country is more open than people realize, though access to any type of online information is still strictly monitored if you’re not high up on the ruling family food chain.

Many North Koreans have cellphones, but those phones are equipped with little more than the ability to call and text, according to Recorded Future. Some, such as “university students, scientists, and select government officials,” have access to the nation’s intranet, which is run and closely monitored by the government. 

While officials might be concerned about the computer activity of their fellow citizens, they’re evidently not that concerned that others can look in on their own computer antics. Recorded Future was able to get their data because, like seemingly damn near everyone else on the internet, the North Korean elite didn’t do much to obscure their online activity.

If that doesn’t prove an obvious commonality, then I’m not sure what does.

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Philippine president admits he used an army of social media trolls while campaigning

Image: NurPhoto via Getty Images

Philippine president Rodrigo Duterte has admitted he paid an army of social media trolls to defend him while he was on the campaign trail last year.

The outspoken and at times controversial politician was defending himself after a University of Oxford study was published, finding that Duterte uses both automated and human trolls on social media.

Speaking at a press conference on Monday, Duterte said: “I spent 10 million [pesos] ($198,000)? Me? Maybe in the election…They were all during the campaign.”

He was refuting accusations that he continued to deploy a social media army, inadvertently admitting that he relied on the strategy in his 2016 presidential campaign.

“I don’t need to defend myself from attacks,” he was quoted as saying by ABS-CBN News. “I’m not anymore eligible for re-election.”

Presidents in the Philippines serve a single six-year term without re-election.

The president added that the University of Oxford was a “school for stupid people”, reported Rappler

Rodrigo Duterte

Rodrigo Duterte

Image: Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

The University of Oxford study explored organised social media manipulation, and weighed the different strategies of political parties and candidates in 28 countries.

It found that social media bots were used by many countries to drum up ideas aligning with party messaging, by inflating social media engagement, “creating an artificial sense of popularity, momentum or relevance.”

An army of 500 to “amplify” ideas

In Duterte’s case, his social media manager has said they’ve used some 400 to 500 people to “amplify” ideas. They individually handled groups on platforms like Facebook, that each had hundreds to hundreds of thousands of followers.

According to a Campaign Asia article, his social team denied using bots in their strategy.

An American journalist pointed out in a PRI article that often, just a damning (or supportive) headline is sufficient to do the trick in pushing a message across. Because many people on Facebook don’t click through to the article — some because they don’t want to incur data costs — all they see is the headline and excerpt.

The study also said that the hired social media manipulators have also continued to “spread and amplify” messages in support of Duterte’s policies after he won the election, something which the president denied.

Duterte is a former mayor who won over 16 million votes on a populist campaign aimed at eliminating drug trafficking.

After being elected, Duterte’s war on drugs drew criticism outside the country for its rampant extra-judicial killings of suspected drug offenders. The president and renewed his call to reinstate the death penalty for crimes involving drugs, during his State of the Nation address this year. 

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