All posts in “scheduling”

Vyte makes it easy to invyte people to your calyndyr


Planning a meeting with me used to take hours. First you must bathe yourself in the ritual Spring of Understanding and then, once completely clean, you must enter the room of Writing Down The Appointment. Once that was complete, I required all those requesting a meeting to complete the three trials including the Making of the Hoagie and the Understanding (And Explaining) Of Django Programming. Ultimately few passed my tests.

Now, however, I just use Vyte. Vyte lets folks visit your private page – like mine – and select a date to meet. You can approve it, set a location, and even decline it. It’s much like competing services like Calendly but I particularly like the ease of use and design.

Founded by French techies Martin Saint-Macary and Philippe Hong the company is self-funded and just starting out. They have 200 paid companies and 6,000 monthly active users.

“I met Philippe at a startup competition a few years ago,” said Saint-Macary. “After enjoying working together on some side projects, we co-founded Vyte together. We started tackling the group scheduling issue, and later realised that oddly enough, scheduling 1-on-1s was a much bigger pain at work, so we refocused on that.”

The system syncs with your Google Calendar and the mobile app acts as its own calendar app, allowing you to replace your default one.

Sadly Vyte does not allow me to force those who wish an audience with me to complete the arduous task of Putting The Fitted Sheet Down The Right Way The First Time it does make it easier for me to pass the buck and say “Hey, click on this and pick a time and I’ll tell you ‘No.’” Thus, as they say, the great world spins.

Smart calendar startup Meetingbird aims to take the headache out of scheduling


It’s a tiny-but-still-annoying part of almost every meeting and phone call — once you agree to meet someone or call them, there’s still another flurry of emails as you try to decide on a time.

Tech companies large and small have tried to improve the meeting process. (I’m a fan of Doodle, myself.)  Now Y combinator-backed startup Meetingbird has taken a stab at it with Meetingbird Meet.

Naturally, co-founder Henry Dornier used Meet to set up a call with me. It was a fast, easy process: He sent me a link where I could look at his availability, pick a time, book it and get an invitation sent back to my own calendar in just a few clicks. (And it all worked fine, even though I don’t have a Meetingbird account.)

But how was this different from other scheduling tools? Dornier pointed to a couple of key distinctions. First, he noted that it’s integrated with the existing Meetingbird calendar (which comes with features like collaborative note-taking), so you don’t have to manually enter your schedule into a separate product.

“It’s a great way for teams, especially, to manage all those meetings that they have together while still being able to take advantage of meeting notes and products,” Dornier said. “There’s no friction anymore between your scheduling tool and your calendar … they’re just the same thing now.”

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That doesn’t mean anyone can book any empty spot on your calendar. You can also set preferences that block off times automatically — for example if, like me, you don’t like to do meetings first thing in the morning.

Second, and also useful for teams, Dornier said Meet is particularly effective with group scheduling, allowing you to see multiple users’ schedules overlayed on top of one another, and then book accordingly. Next up are further improvements that are specifically designed for larger teams.

“Basically, we wanted to sort of solve the scheduling issue once and for all,” Dornier said.