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How to put old photos in your social media stories

You can add old photos to your social media stories.
You can add old photos to your social media stories.

Image: lili sams/mashable

Stories started with Snapchat, then Instagram and Facebook added their own versions to try and win our loyalty. 

There are crazy amounts of ways to make your story unique within each app. But you might not know that you can also post old photos in your current stories.

Here’s how to put photos you’ve already taken in your stories on Snapchat, Instagram, and Facebook. Just note that your followers might get a little annoyed if you do it too much.

Snapchat 

Access Snapchat and camera roll photos at the bottom of your screen.

Access Snapchat and camera roll photos at the bottom of your screen.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

Open up Snapchat and you’ll see a little bubble on your screen directly underneath the circle button to snap a new photo. Click that and you’ll see a screen with photos you’ve saved on Snapchat and from your camera roll. 

Hit "Edit and Send" (which is covered by this caption) to jazz up your photo.

Hit “Edit and Send” (which is covered by this caption) to jazz up your photo.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

Scroll through either feed until you find the old photo you want to post. After you pick one, there will be an option asking if you’d like to edit the photo before sending. This will bring up all of the editing options you normally see on Snapchat. 

Photos from your camera roll appear with a white border around them.

Photos from your camera roll appear with a white border around them.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

When it’s all ready to roll, click the blue arrow button to send to your story or any of your friends. It’s worth noting that photos pulled from Snapchat will look normal, but the ones taken from your camera roll will appear with a white border and say they’re from your camera roll. In other words, people will be well aware of the fact that you’re posting an old photo. If that doesn’t bother you, everything’s good to go. 

Instagram

Instagram works somewhat similarly. However, you can only post photos that you’ve saved to your camera roll in the last 24 hours. So, if you want to post a photo from last week you’re going to have to re-save it. 

Add photos from your camera roll to your Instagram story.

Add photos from your camera roll to your Instagram story.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

To get started, hit the camera button in the upper lefthand of the app or just hit your face icon by the rest of the stories. Choose the box next to the flash icon on the screen to see your photos. 

Camera roll photos get cropped in your story.

Camera roll photos get cropped in your story.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

Pick a photo and it’ll appear on your screen, ready to be edited. A slight downfall is that you don’t have a say in how it’s displayed. The photo will fit to the screen, so parts of it might get cut off. In the example used above, Instagram cut off a fourth person that was standing to the left of me. However, you can still edit it just like any other Instagram story. Do that and hit “Your Story” and it’ll show up in your story for the next 24 hours. 

Facebook

Once again, Facebook is similar to the other two, with slight differences. 

Add old photos to your Facebook story.

Add old photos to your Facebook story.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

Hit your icon at the top of your Facebook mobile app to create a story. Then tap the little square button on the far right of the screen. It will bring photos from your camera roll to the bottom of the screen so you can scroll through to find the one you want. 

Posting old photos to your Facebook story only takes a minute.

Posting old photos to your Facebook story only takes a minute.

Image: molly sequin/mashable

All of the editing options will pop up after you select a photo. Add any stickers or filters you want, then hit “Your Story” to make it live. You’ll confirm by clicking “Add” and your old photo will appear on your Facebook. And no one will be able to tell it’s not a photo you just took. 

Now you know how to post old photos to your social media stories, so start sharing some of your best memories.

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Run to the rock


The past week has been a tough one for lovers of freedom. Slippery slopes have been slid down and a side of the human mind that once remained in shadow has reared its head. Charlottesville is just the first step down a dark road.

In real life, on the public square, our support of freedom of speech and public assembly – a freedom that has long helped hater and lover alike – is in question. Do we open our squares to men who will fight equality? Do we unlock our school grounds so that fear can reign? Do we simply close our windows on loudspeakers calling out for genocide or do we act? I don’t have an answer, but sunlight has always been the best antiseptic and seeing most of these groups on a bare parade ground lays bare their insignificance.

But what do you about the Internet where everything is shadow hiding inside corporate iron? The Internet is a utility, to a degree, but not one whose sanctity is guaranteed to us by some holy writ. We send bits over corporate networks onto servers housed in corporate basements. We shout into corporate megaphones and write screeds – like this one – into corporate editor windows.

On that skein of wires there is no sunlight. We, the creators of that world, must decide. Do we let hate live alongside love? What is conversation when everyone yells? What is fair when everyone has the loudest voice?

I was once a free-love kind of Internet zealot. I still agree that DRM is wrong, that media wants to be free and that good media will be paid for by someone. I still agree that sex is far less egregious than violence and that visions of both help define the lines of our personalities and ensure we do not wander too far into some puritan desert. I was angry, for example, when Pinterest pulled sexual content but know I know things have changed. Pinterest runs is own servers. It is responsible for the contents. It deserves final say.

And that’s where we are now. If you hate, says Wired in a recent profile of Instagram’s Kevin Systrom, you will be shut down.

“Insta­gram is supposed to be a place for self-expression and joy,” wrote Nicholas Thompson in the profile. “Who wants to express themselves, though, if they’re going to be mocked, harassed, and shamed in the comments below a post? Instagram is a bit like Disneyland—if every now and then the seven dwarfs hollered at Snow White for looking fat.”

Or who wants to star in a Ghostbusters reboot and be called racial slurs? And who wants to live in a world where /r/aww lives next to /r/poli?

We, the curators of the Internet, have to decide. Some of us already have. We see Cloudflare and GoDaddy pulling their services from white power site Daily Stormer. Cloudflare’s CEO Matthew Prince agonized over the decision. He, like most Internet users, expects the web to be free as in freedom.

“Our team has been thorough and have had thoughtful discussions for years about what the right policy was on censoring. Like a lot of people, we’ve felt angry at these hateful people for a long time but we have followed the law and remained content neutral as a network. We could not remain neutral after these claims of secret support by Cloudflare,” he wrote. “You, like me, may believe that the Daily Stormer’s site is vile. You may believe it should be restricted. You may think the authors of the site should be prosecuted. Reasonable people can and do believe all those things. But having the mechanism of content control be vigilante hackers launching DDoS attacks subverts any rational concept of justice.”

In the end this is where we must go. It’s folks like Rabbi Abe Cooper as well as Valley CEOs who will help us find a way forward. Freedom of speech in the public square is one right we all have. But there is no free speech in the walled garden if the gardener doesn’t will it.

Listen to Nina Simone. She sang an old spiritual and sang it beautifully.

“Oh, sinnerman, where you gonna run to? Where you gonna run to? All on that day,” she said. “We got to run to the rock. Please hide me, I run to the rock. All on that day. But the rock cried out. I can’t hide you, the rock cried out. I ain’t gonna hide you there.”

Haters are hiding. They run to the rock. The rock is cries out. It won’t hide them. They must stand, then, and face those they wronged. This is the way it has always been and always will be. We can’t let the Internet change that.

Fan strikes ‘Rick and Morty’ gold — sells Szechuan sauce for $15,000 Schmeckles

No one worships useless, pointless nonsense like the Rick and Morty fanbase. And I say that with all the love in my plumbus.

Season 3’s surprise April Fools premiere ended with Rick’s crazed, psychopathic rant about how his “9 Season character arc” would revolve around getting McDonald’s discontinued Szechuan sauce back.

It was the lunatic ravings of a madman, and Rick and Morty fans took up the creed as a religion.

McDonald’s responded to their petitions in kind when the second episode released several months later. They not only sent co-creator Justin Roiland his beloved sauce, but also gave away three more 64oz bottles to randomly selected fans.

One such fan was Robert Workman, a writer on Comicbook.com who hit 90’s Mulan movie tie-in sauce jackpot. He retweeted the McDonald’s contest with the simple phrase “NINE MORE SEASONS.” 

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But rather than tear into it right away, Workman polled the internet for suggestions on what to do with it, ranging from bathing in the sauce to selling it. Selling won by only a small margin. And one Ebay listing later, Workman was up a cool $15,000 Schmeckles.

The bidding hit peak internet when Deadmau5 tweeted about trying to clinch the auction himself. When the price started reaching into the tens of thousands, Workman chose to give a percentage of the proceeds to Able Gamers, Extra Life, Take This, the Ronald McDonald House and other charities.

Unfortunately, Workman has yet to hear back from the ultimate winner, but he’s got plans for a 2nd place winner in case of fraud.

Throughout Workman’s Szechuan sauce journey, he not only made friends with Deadmau5, but also McDonald’s famed Chef Mike Haracz himself.

When I asked how tempted he was to crack open the bottle of teriyaki-like sauce gold himself, Workman explained that he’d already had a taste of the stuff back in ’98. “But, man, I won’t lie. I was tempted to open this bad boy and jet down to McDonald’s for some nuggets.”

All in all, while the attention his harrowing journey has received proved, “overwhelming,” Workman said that ultimately, “It’s been a fun ride.”

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Facebook may have snuck an app into China’s App Store

Image: Schiefelbein/AP/REX/Shutterstock

Facebook is even more desperate to have a presence in China than we thought.

The social network has been secretly testing a photo sharing app in the country, according to a new report in The New York Times. 

The app, reportedly called “Colorful Balloons” is apparently a Chinese version of Facebook’s photo-sharing app, Moments. The app, first released in the U.S. in 2014, allows friends to make group albums to privately share photos from their phone.

Unlike the U.S version, which requires a Facebook account, Colorful Balloons uses WeChat — the messaging app that’s nearly universal in China. Users can also share photos via QR codes, which are extremely common in the country.

Facebook has reportedly gone to great lengths to disguise that they’re the ones truly behind the service, The New York Times reports. The app was reportedly published by a company named “Youge Internet Technology” in China’s App Store and early users reportedly aren’t able to easily share the app with outsiders. 

“We have long said that we are interested in China, and are spending time understanding and learning more about the country in different ways,” a Facebook spokesperson said in a statement. “Our focus right now is on helping Chinese businesses and developers expand to new markets outside China by using our ad platform.”

While Mark Zuckerberg and other execs have maintained for years that they have every intention of bringing Facebook to China, they have adamantly refused every opportunity to publicly discuss how they would do so. Like many other major U.S. tech companies, China’s strict censorship laws have prevented the social network from having a presence in the country.

That the company could now be testing an app disguised as a service from a local company is not just unheard of — it’s incredibly ballsy. 

It’s no secret that Mark Zuckerberg has been desperately courting China for years. He’s made multiple trips to the country and learned to speak Mandarin. But any inroads made by such efforts could be negated if the Chinese government learns Facebook secretly pushed an app into the country anyway.

UPDATE: Aug. 11, 2017, 2:56 p.m. PDT Updated with Facebook’s statement.

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Yes, there’s now an app with the sole purpose of showing you dank memes

If you enjoy wasting time on the internet, you’re probably going to love Memeois, the new iOS app made solely to deliver you the hottest new memes.

The app was made by 17-year-old Anushk Mittal and is free for download on iOS. Just be warned that the only way to enter the app is by signing in through a Facebook account. We don’t see any reason to be alarmed up front, but it’s something you might want to consider before joining.

The app apparently uses machine learning to crawl your Facebook activity to determine what memes it thinks you want to see. It also surfaces different trends based on your activity within the app.

I took the app for a quick test drive this morning and can confirm Memeois does in fact deliver memes you might actually like. I saved a few of the funnier ones to my “Book” by hitting Share below the meme, and even better ones started showing up. 

The feed quickly become personalized.

The feed quickly become personalized.

Image: memeois

And if you want to become the world’s next memelord, Memeois could be the tool to take you to the next level. The app provides templates and lets you create new memes from scratch. And if you don’t quite love the look or message of your meme after it goes live, just use Quick Edit to spruce it up and keep your friends laughing. 

Scroll through memes chosen for you or create your own.

Scroll through memes chosen for you or create your own.

Image: memeois

Memeois also features a place to discover new memes in different categories. Go to “Discover” and select an image to bring you into a folder full of similar memes. You can share your funniest finds and creations to social media right from the app, or add them to your Book for friends and family to browse.

The app works on the iPhone and Apple Watch. So, the next time you find yourself with a little bit of spare time, download Memeois and get ready to ROFL.

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