All posts in “The Boring Company”

Elon Musk’s ultra-high-speed hyperloop will cost just $1 to ride

Elon Musk is sick of Los Angeles traffic.

The Boring Company, Tesla and SpaceX CEO said he was late to his own tunnel company’s information session at a synagogue in Los Angeles on Thursday night because of traffic on a major freeway. He called the congested highway “the seventh or eighth level” of hell.

To tackle “soul-destroying traffic” plaguing most major U.S. cities, Musk said, “There’s a few ways to skin this cat.” Instead of building more roads and highways or heading into the sky, as Uber envisions with its flying cars, Musk wants to go below ground — like 30 to 100 feet below ground — with an autonomous highway-like high-speed tunnel hyperloop system.

Best bit? Musk says city hyperloop trips will only cost $1.

The Boring Company has been working on test tunnels in LA, and at the info session Musk laid out what this will look like. It’s not certain exactly when this is happening, but Musk likes things to come together quickly. State, city, and county officials not so much. LA city officials recently gave the OK for 2.7 miles of test track, which Musk revealed in a video last week. Just before Thursday’s info session Musk said the LA Metro system had agreed to work with the tunnel company.

Musk laid out what would eventually be miles of underground track all over LA with small mini stations, approximately the size of a parking spot, that take passengers from street level to the underground tunnel system in high-speed pods. He promised eight-minute trips from downtown LA to the airport and Dodger Stadium — all for $1 a trip.

Musk talks about tunnels and high-speed travel with The Boring Company's mascot, Gary the snail.

Musk talks about tunnels and high-speed travel with The Boring Company’s mascot, Gary the snail.

Musk also highlighted a vast system of small stations that would take about 16 passengers at a time, a weatherproof system (it’s all the same this far down), and minimal impact on neighborhoods and communities since no divisive highways or roads will pave over areas.

“For tunnels you can have hundreds of lanes, there’s no real limit,” he said. The tunnel system could also continue deeper and deeper with more demand. Here, Musk made sure to include a dig directed at UberAir, the ambitious electric passenger drone system dreamed up by the ride-hailing app. Uber plans to demo flights in LA by 2020. 

“You can’t fly the quietest helicopters through neighborhoods without bothering people,” Musk said. He promised that all the digging and boring required to build the hyperloop will go undetected because it’s so far down. 

“It’s quite difficult to detect when a tunnel is being dug,” he said. “We’re invisible.”

The LAX hyperloop station will be bigger than the stations all over the city.

The LAX hyperloop station will be bigger than the stations all over the city.

Image: the boring company

Eventually Musk wants the hyperloop to connect cities — San Francisco to LA, New York to Baltimore — and for those trips he’s tapping into his SpaceX rocket techniques to build vacuum tunnels that go 300 mph. 

For more urban experiences, for example, commutes throughout LA, Musk envisions 150 mph trips. And yes, it’ll apparently only cost you that dollar.

Musk spent a hefty portion of the info session explaining the boring process itself using electric motors and battery packs, and what he plans to do with the massive amounts of dirt, including building seismically sound bricks and life-size Lego kits.

For all those patiently waiting for your “not-flamethrowers” from the Boring Company — Musk said the company would start personally delivering the highly flammable devices in two weeks. 

With Musk everything’s at hyper-speed.

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Elon Musk’s Boring Co. flamethrower ships in time for summer BBQs

Elon Musk raised a significant chunk of money for his tunnel boring venture, the aptly named Boring Company, via sales of a heavily marked up ‘flamethrower’ with Boring Co. branding. Those pre-sales are all concluded, but now people who put down cash to reserve one are finding out when they can get their flame on.

In an email to pre-order buyers, The Boring Company noted that the technically “not-a-flamethrower” production run should be wrapping up this spring, which means deliveries can be expected at least in time for “summer party” time. That’s good because people definitely need this fire generating device in time for the dry summer months, when forest fire risks are highest.

Another tidbit from the note to buyers: Customers can expect terms and conditions to be signed off ahead of shipments, which should be heading out in the next couple of weeks according to the company. The Boring Co. notes that these will be “rhyming,” and I presume they mean that literally – but they probably also have the serious purpose of making sure Elon’s corporate lawyers can once again enjoy something resembling sleep when these go out to customers.

Based on the shipping schedule of The Boring Company hat, which (full disclosure) I did buy (I did not buy the ‘not flamethrower’ flamethrower), if you ordered these you can probably still expect to wait a few more weeks if not months.

Here’s how to make The Boring Company’s flamethrower


Obligatory disclaimer: Don’t be dumb.

What follows is a video showing high level instructions on how to build a nearly exact copy of The Boring Company’s flamethrower. Basically, gut this $125 Airsoft gun and insert a propane torch. The total bill of goods should be under $200, well under the $500 The Boring Company was charging until it sold out of the 20k units.

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As many pointed out before, The Boring Company Flamethrower is muddling the definition of a flamethrower. It’s more of a large torch like those used in roofing or to clear brush or melt ice.

Whatever. It’s okay to have fun sometimes.

Elon Musk said following launching a Tesla Roadster into space, “It’s kind of silly and fun, but I think that silly and fun things are important.” I agree. This DIY flamethrower is silly and fun and it’s the type of project that could inspire and engage someone into discovering mechanical engineering. Just don’t be dumb. Please.

Elon Musk has now sold 15K flamethrowers, earning $7.5M for boring


The Boring Company is getting decently well-capitalized on the back of sales of its flamethrower (yes, flamethrower). The no-doubt overpriced piece of knack, which can be make yourself at home using likely around $30 in parts, is selling for $500 and has already netted Elon Musk’s digging venture $7.5 million.

That’s after just over a day of being on sale, and not counting the revenue from fire extinguisher sales (those sell for just $30, which is itself also overpriced). All told, Musk says he’s sold 15,000 of the flamethrowers thus far, with only a total of 20,000 available in total during the sale.

Chances are, we’re very near the total sell-out of the stock, so if you really want to own this potential piece of transportation history, you’d better act fast. Or you could continue living your life, and ignore this particular circus show in favor of paying attention to what will hopefully be the main act: Actually building a network of interconnected underground hyperloops.

Elon Musk’s Boring Co. flamethrower is real, $500 and up for pre-order


So that flamethrower that Elon Musk teased The Boring Company would start selling after it ran out of its 50,000 hats? Yeah, it’s real – and you can pre-order one now if you want need a ridiculous way to spend $500.

Musk revealed the flamethrower on Saturday, after some digging tipped its existence late last week. The Boring Company Flamethrower is functional, too, as you can see from this Instagram featuring some Boring Co. staff, presumably well safety trained, firing off two of the things IRL.

Marketing copy for the flamethrower includes a “guarantee” that it will “liven up any party,” and a proclamation that it’s “world’s safest flamethrower,” in case you were concerned (you probably are not, if you’re ordering a flamethrower on the internet). The $500 fee doesn’t include taxes and shipping, which are added at checkout, and the initial shipments will come out in spring.

There’s also a disclaimer about international shipping incurring extra fees (and maybe seizure at the border?) plus, buyers will be required to review and accept a terms and conditions document prior to getting their flamethrower in the mail.

The Boring Co. also sells a fire extinguisher, because they know how to make an upsell with specific relevance, and it’s $30, which they fully admit is more than you’d pay elsewhere. But it has a sticker. There’s not even a picture, so it probably doesn’t look all that impressive.

Musk’s Boring Company is literally a company focused on tunnel boring, but it seems like it’ll be a while before it has revenue or significant results (even if it’s already digging test tunnels). To fund the project until then, selling weird stuff with the company’s logo to Muskheads everywhere seems like a decent plan. Even if it contributes negatively to the sum total of working flamethrowers existing in the world.