All posts in “Windows 10”

10 of the best laptops for Windows 10

The Huawei MateBook X Pro is such a great Windows laptop that it might actually make devoted Apple fans blush and consider making the switch from Mac to PC. Why is that, you might ask? Well, the laptop is powerful with its Intel Core i7-8550U processor and Intel UHD Graphics 620 and Nvidia GeForce MX150 graphics card working together to deliver fantastic performance again and again. 
The laptop runs Windows 10 Signature Edition, so there’s no bloatware or free trial software slowing you down with annoying pop-ups and clutter. In fact, the Huawei MateBook X Pro gives you the best and cleanest Windows 10 experience yet, which makes it ideal for people thinking about making the switch.
Not to mention the laptop’s sleek and sexy design that looks pretty familiar. There’s no doubt about it, Huawei designed the MateBook X Pro to mimic the Apple MacBook Pro, which explains its name and design. In fact, the laptop even comes in Space Gray, as a possible way to attract Apple users to make the leap to Windows 10. 
However, the MateBook X Pro’s design is also functional thanks to the laptop’s impressive, near bezel-less display, which is also a touchscreen. Huawei achieves a massive 91% screen-to-body ratio with a clever design by eliminating the laptop’s webcam placement. Believe it or not, but the webcam is hidden as a handy pop-out in the keyboard itself. This design choice works to give more screen real estate to the display and to keep the webcam covered when not in use. (So there’s no need for unsightly tape to cover it up.) Although it’s already hidden and out of the way, it does give unflattering views when it’s on, which might get annoying if you’re always in video meetings or conference calls.
The laptop is compact and lightweight too, weighing just under 3 lbs. The Huawei MateBook X Pro is perfect for commuting and traveling, while the laptop has fantastic usability with an assortment of ports, such as one USB 3.0, one USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), one USB-C 3.1, an HDMI port, and a VGA port. While the laptop is a winner in most categories, the MateBook X Pro features a ho-hum battery life with an average of eight hours of use on a single charge. Overall, while there are some minor flaws, the Huawei MateBook X Pro is designed to impress and built for work and entertainment, as a brilliant Windows 10 laptop.
Although it heavily copies what makes the Apple MacBook Pro great, the Huawei MateBook X Pro is a legit MacOS alternative for Windows 10 users. With its sleek and sexy build and design, the laptop will turn heads, while also considered one of the best PC machines out there.
The Huawei MateBook X Pro starts at $1,199.99 on Amazon.

Alexa and Cortana are finally on speaking terms

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Chromebooks that also run Windows 10 may be in the works

Would you want the ability to run Windows 10 on your Chromebook?
Would you want the ability to run Windows 10 on your Chromebook?

Image: raymond wong/mashable

Dual-booting — AKA having two operating systems on the same computer — might be landing on a Chromebook near you.

As spotted by the online software development community XDA Developers, it appears the software team behind Chrome OS has been working on “Campfire,” a feature that would enable dual-booting with Windows 10. Google has not spoken about this in any official way, but on a open Chrome OS forum run by Google, sometimes future tools are worked on in the public eye. 

Campfire wouldn’t just support higher-end Chrome OS devices like the Pixelbook but also Chromebooks from Acer, HP, and Lenovo. While these code snippets don’t outline all the specifications, it would be a safe bet that only Intel-based Chromebooks (like the Pixelbook) could handle the dual-booting.

The big caveat is that you need a substantial amount of storage, thanks to the size of Windows 10, and there aren’t that many Chromebooks with large storage, since most of Chrome OS runs in the cloud. According to the code, the minimum size of the Windows partition is 30GB. For any apps that need large amount of space (e.g. Quickbooks, Photoshop, Fortnite, etc.), you’ll probably want more.

Let’s not forget that a copy of Windows 10 doesn’t come cheap either; Windows 10 Home is $139, while Windows 10 Pro costs $199. A manufacturer Windows license is generally cheaper, but Chromebooks tend to undercut Windows laptops on price, and having Windows pre-installed would certainly raise the cost of a Chrome OS device somewhat.

It’s unclear if dual-booting could support a build of Linux, like Ubuntu. 

The Chromebook Pixelbook will likely be the first to support this new feature.

The Chromebook Pixelbook will likely be the first to support this new feature.

Image: raymond wong/mashable

Dual-boot Chromebooks would be a weird move on Google’s part, as Chrome OS is an alternative to Windows to some degree. A dual-boot system would be meeting some users in the middle who want both a Windows and Chrome OS experience on the same device. It’s similar to Boot Camp on a Mac — it gives you the best of both worlds, just for a very specific use case. 

Recently Google brought the Play Store to Chrome OS, which allows Android apps to run natively on Chromebooks. For some Windows users, it might be attractive to be able to run Android apps on their Windows machine. That’s a better selling point than bringing Chrome OS to Windows users, since they can already run the Chrome browser.

Will Campfire ever be released? And when? Those are unknowns, but several posts on a Chrome OS forum imply it’s being worked on by a number of forrm users. While it’s unclear if all those users work for Google, only users with a ‘@google.com’ or ‘@chromium.com’ are supposed to be able to edit Chrome OS code.

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Microsoft Surface Go review: Barely better than a netbook

Excellent build quality • Sharp • bright display • Windows Hello support • Built-in microSD card slot
Sluggish performance • Janky touchscreen for some apps like Chrome • Keyboard and stylus sold separately • Huge • thick bezels around display
Microsoft’s Surface Go is the cheapest way to buy into the Surface ecosystem, but sluggish performance keeps it from competing with Apple’s iPads.

Mashable Score3.25

On paper, Microsoft’s miniature Surface Pro, the Surface Go (starting at $399), crushes Apple’s iPad into the ground.

The Surface Go offers a full Windows 10 desktop experience compared to the iPad’s blown-up version of iOS. You can also sign into the Go with your face using Windows Hello. It supports the Microsoft Pen stylus and the Type Cover keyboard, which comes with a trackpad. The Go also has a small, but equally as robust, kickstand just like the Surface Pro.

And yet, I can’t say I really enjoyed using the device over the last few days. 

The Surface Go is Microsoft’s attempt to make its Surface devices accessible to more people. Think of it as a gateway into the Surface ecosystem. 

Starting at $399, it’s half the price of the entry-level $799 Surface Pro. The tablet’s lower price also means — whether Microsoft likes it or not — its main competitor is the iPad: both the 9.7-inch iPad (starts at $329) and 10.5-inch iPad Pro (starts at $649).

I applaud Microsoft for lowering the Surface entry fee, but the Surface Go’s too underpowered and the full Windows 10 experience isn’t optimized well for such a small screen. 

Even though it’s definitely more powerful, the parallels between the Surface Go and netbooks (remember those?) gave me goosebumps.

A mini-sized Surface Pro

The Go's got a really sharp 10-inch screen.

The Go’s got a really sharp 10-inch screen.

Image: raymond wong/mashable

It’s virtually impossible to look at the Surface Go and and not think: Aww, it’s a baby Surface Pro. It’s so cute!

The Surface Go is indeed an adorable little tablet, especially when you pair it with a Type Cover keyboard and Surface Pen.

It’s roughly the size of a 10.5-inch iPad Pro and only a little thicker (0.33 inches versus 0.30 inches) and slightly heavier (1.15 pounds versus 1.03 pounds). You’ll barely notice it in your backpack or purse.

The Surface Go sports a 10-inch 3:2 aspect display with 1,800 x 1,200 resolution and some really thick bezels surrounding it. 

The body's made of magnesium and it's really sturdy just like the Surface Pro.

The body’s made of magnesium and it’s really sturdy just like the Surface Pro.

Image: RAYMOND WONG/MASHABLE

It’s a solid screen that’s bright and has wide viewing angles, but the bezels really make it look terribly dated. Every tablet’s moving towards slimmer bezels and I can’t help but wish Microsoft had fit a larger screen into the durable magnesium body.

The built-in kickstand extends up to 165 degrees and is as satisfying as ever to open up. At no point during my daily use did the kickstand feel like it’d snap. Push the kickstand back, and you’ll find a microSD card slot for storage expansion.

Lean backkk!

Lean backkk!

Image: RAYMOND WONG/MASHABLE

Cut into the Surface Go’s left and right bezels are a pair of front-facing stereo speakers with support for Dolby Audio Premium. They are not the clearest or loudest-sounding speakers on a tablet — the iPad Pro’s quad speakers are better in my opinion — but they are front-firing, which makes it almost impossible to muffle them with your hands.

There’s a 5-megapixel HD camera on the front and then 8-megapixel camera on the back. The cameras work well in a pinch for video calls and I love that that the front camera supports Windows Hello sign-in with your face (it sure beats entering a password or PIN code).

Windows Hello sign-in should be standard on all Windows 10 devices.

Windows Hello sign-in should be standard on all Windows 10 devices.

Image: RAYMOND WONG/MASHABLE

Heck yeah, front-firing stereo speakers.

Heck yeah, front-firing stereo speakers.

Image: RAYMOND WONG/MASHABLE

The Go doesn’t have many ports: just one USB-C 3.1 port, headphone jack, and the Surface Connector. Both the USB-C port and the Connector can be used to charge up the tablet. And with the Surface Dock ($199), you can also expand the number of ports to more.

All the ports you get: Headphone jack, USB-C, and Surface Connector.

All the ports you get: Headphone jack, USB-C, and Surface Connector.

Image: RAYMOND WONG/MASHABLE

Having toured Microsoft’s durability labs where Surface devices are designed and stress-tested, I expected nothing but the best and Microsoft really delivered with top-notch hardware for the Go.

It’s so painfully slow

I wish it wasn’t so, but the Surface Go’s biggest weakness is performance. It’s too slow and sluggish for getting any real work done.

I had concerns about performance when Microsoft first told me the Surface Go was powered by an Intel Pentium Gold seventh-generation Intel Pentium Gold 4415Y processor and limited RAM (the $399 model comes with 4GB of RAM and 64GB of storage and the 8GG of RAM with 128GB of storage) and they were confirmed during my testing.

This Pentium chip is significantly slower than the Intel Core m3 chip inside of the entry-level Surface Pro. Microsoft touts 33 percent faster graphics than a Intel Core i5-powered Surface Pro 3 and 20 percent faster graphics performance than Core i7-powered Surface Pro 3, but honestly, none of these figures really matter because the Surface Go chokes up fast under even light usage.

The Go's Pentium processor is really wimpy.

The Go’s Pentium processor is really wimpy.

Image: RAYMOND WONG/MASHABLE

Google Chrome, an app that pretty much everyone uses, couldn’t handle more than a couple of open tabs. Loading websites was unusually slow on both my fast work and home WiFi. Scrolling with the touchscreen was often not very smooth within Chrome (using the Type Cover’s trackpad to scroll is smoother, but it still sometimes stuttered).

For what it’s worth, Microsoft’s Edge browser works way better than Chrome on the Surface Go. I saw almost none of the janky scrolling issues while using Edge.

Many of these problems were most apparent in Chrome, but the slowness is noticeable all throughout Windows 10 on the Surface Go. There’s lag when opening photos. There’s lag when launching apps. There’s even lag when opening up the settings to change the desktop wallpaper. Even on my higher-spec’d Surface Go review unit with 8GB of RAM, the slowdown was too real.

Not to mention, Windows 10 doesn’t work very well for on such small touchscreen. Out of the box, the OS is magnified to 150 percent to make things easier to tap. But if you try to open up two apps in split-screen, the text is often either too large or too small. There’s just not enough screen to properly multitask with multiple windows.

iOS works so well on an iPad because it was designed for touch, not mouse and keyboard. Windows 10 was made for the other way around. For a good Windows 10 touchscreen experience, the screen really needs to be larger. The Surface Pro’s 12.3-inch screen feels like the smallest size a touch-enabled Windows 10 device can go to work really well.

The Type Cover ($129 sold separately) attaches to the Go just like on the Surface Pro.

The Type Cover ($129 sold separately) attaches to the Go just like on the Surface Pro.

Image: RAYMOND WONG/MASHABLE

By default the Surface Go ships with Windows 10 in “S Mode.” If you recall, this is the version of Windows 10 that only lets you install apps from the Microsoft Store. S Mode’s great — Windows 10 performance is smoother and more secure — if all the apps you need are already available in the app store. 

S Mode, however, is unusable for most people like me. I need apps like Google Chrome and Adobe Photoshop CC that can only be installed with S Mode turned off. And while turning S Mode off only takes a few seconds, it’s irreversible.

It's a solid keyboard, but really cramped.

It’s a solid keyboard, but really cramped.

Image: RAYMOND WONG/MASHABLE

Microsoft claims up to 9 hours of continuous battery life for the Surface Go, but this is only for watching offline video.

In real-world use, I got between 4 to 7.5 hours with the default battery optimization set to prioritize better battery life over performance. 

Streaming YouTube videos at full HD resolution or a video on Netflix drained the Surface Go at a rate of about 13-14 percent an hour. My workload of using Chrome with about a dozen tabs, listening to music on Spotify, and watching a few short videos drained the battery at a rate of between 20-25 percent an hour.

As always, battery life is going to vary depending on your own personal workload and device settings. It goes without saying that lowering the brightness or switching Windows 10 to the battery saver mode will increase battery life. That said, I had to set the battery to “Better performance” or “Best performance” to mitigate much of the Surface Go’s sluggishness, and even then it still lagged.

The touchscreen is pretty darn responsive.

The touchscreen is pretty darn responsive.

Image: RAYMOND WONG/MASHABLE

Don’t get me wrong, the Surface Go’s touchscreen is certainly responsive to fingers and the Surface Pen, and you can for sure get a light amount of work done on the device if you can deal with the barely-acceptable performance, but do you really want to?

Same goes for the Type Cover keyboard (sold separately). The accessory connects to the Surface Go with a simple magnet, the keys have good travel, and the trackpad is on point, but do you really want to type on such a cramped keyboard? 

I tried writing this review entirely on the Type Cover and only made only made it through 30 minutes before my arms got fatigued and I switched back to a 13-inch laptop with a more spacious keyboard.

Who’s the Surface Go for?

You have to really love the Surface brand to buy the Go.

You have to really love the Surface brand to buy the Go.

Image: RAYMOND WONG/MASHABLE

I’ve been struggling to figure out who Microsoft’s Surface Go is actually good for.

If you already own Surface Pro or any laptop, why would you buy a smaller tablet with huge bezels that often chokes Windows 10 up due to its under-powered Intel Pentium processor? Why would you want to type on a cramped little keyboard? 

But then it hit me: The answer’s right in the name. The Surface Go is good for when you’re on the move and that’s really it. 

It’s good for very, very short bursts of light productivity. Pound out a couple of emails at the coffee shop. Watch a video on the plane. Edit a few documents in a cab.

But these light tasks are also all things that can be accomplished on a cheap Chromebook or iPad. So, again, why get a Surface Go? And don’t say Windows 10 because what good is having the full operating system to run apps like Photoshop if it doesn’t have the power to reliably power them?

I suppose if you’re a diehard Surface or Windows user, the Surface Go’s a neat tablet. And maybe if you’re a student on a super tight budget who doesn’t need a lot of performance because you’re mostly browsing the web or writing in a word processor. 

A portable device of this size that runs full Windows seemed practical a decade ago. Windows still has its place and will for a while, but for light productivity, the world’s moved on.

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Razer’s Blade 15 is damn close to a perfect gaming laptop

Huge screen with slim bezels • VR-ready NVIDIA GTX 1060 or 1070 graphics • Comfy • bouncy keys • Comes with tons of ports • Top-notch performance
Heats up badly when pushed to its max • Awful arrow key layout • Pretty expensive
Razer’s Blade 15 (2018) is damn close to being the perfect gaming laptop with powerful performance, great battery life, and an amazing display.

Mashable Score4.0

If your gaming laptop looks like a Transformer reject, you’re stuck in the past.

I kid — there’s nothing wrong if you prefer gaming laptops with sharp edges and an excessive amount of RGB lighting. 

But I prefer mine like the new Razer Blade 15: clean, powerful, and my oh my, just look at its gorgeous screen with slim bezels!

Since the original Blade gaming laptop hit the scene in 2011, Razer’s experimented with a number of display sizes over the years, some of which were too similar in size to others.

So it’s good to see Razer simplify its product line. The new Blade 15 replaces the old 14-inch Blade. Now, the Blade family consists of three laptops: the 13.3-inch Blade Stealth, the 15.6-inch Blade 15, and the 17.3-inch Blade Pro.

The Blade 15 isn’t just a larger display with an updated processor — it’s a top-to-bottom redesign revamp — fitting of modern laptop trends.

Boxier design

Razer’s Blade laptops have always been sweet-looing, but their design is hardly original. Anyone who isn’t blind could see the laptops took heavy inspiration from Apple’s MacBook Pros. They’re great laptops to imitate, but for a company that prides itself on industrial design, it just felt lazy.

The Blade 15 is the first time we’re seeing an original construction. The laptop’s still made out of aluminum so it’s sturdy and mostly flex-free (there’s still some give on the lid, but you won’t notice it unless you’re deliberately flexing it).

Don't like the glowing Razer logo? Not to worry, you can turn the backlighting off.

Don’t like the glowing Razer logo? Not to worry, you can turn the backlighting off.

Image: raymond wong/mashable

The large rounded corners are gone, replaced with smaller, less curvy ones. The Blade 15 has a boxier design than any Razer laptop before it — it feels a bit like a reference design — which felt a little generic at first, but I quickly became smitten by its lack of gaudy gamer trims.

The dimensions are roughly the same as a current-gen 15-inch MacBook Pro. The Blade 15 is a little thicker (0.66 inch vs. 0.61 inch) and a half-pound heavier (4.5 pounds vs. 4.05 pounds). I thought the extra half pound might make the Blade 15 less portable, but that wasn’t the case. I was able to comfortably carry the laptop from work to home and vice versa without feeling like my backpack was being excessively weighed down.

The Blade 15 is boxy alright.

The Blade 15 is boxy alright.

Image: raymond wong/mashable

What I didn’t enjoy tossing in my bag was the power adapter. The 230-watt adapter is big and heavy — twice the size of the 15-inch MacBook Pro’s 87-watt power adapter. But I suppose if you compare the power adapter to those from other gaming laptops in this class, they’re similarly sized. 

I’m also not a fan of the adapter’s proprietary plug. Though some people will appreciate that the plug is fortified in an L-shaped plastic enclosure, I found it annoying and, frankly, ugly. It’s also weird how the power adapter’s cable is half-braided on one side and not on the other. Bottom line, I hated dragging the power adapter around.

Features for today

All laptops, gaming or not, should have thin bezels.

All laptops, gaming or not, should have thin bezels.

Image: raymond wong/mashable

One of the Blade 15’s marquee features is its display. Although the laptop’s dimensions are similar to the now discontinued 14-inch Blade, the screen is larger.

To cram in a larger 15.6-inch screen, Razer shrank the bezels around it — they’re only 4.9mm (0.19 inch) on the left and right of the display — to achieve a screen-to-body ratio of almost 85 percent. 

The Dell XPS 13 only has an 80.7 percent screen-to-body ratio. The only laptop I can think of with a higher percentage than the Blade 15 is Huawei’s MateBook X Pro, which boasts a whopping 91 percent screen-to-body ratio.

The full HD versions of the Blade 15 have matte screens.

The full HD versions of the Blade 15 have matte screens.

Image: raymond wong/mashable

There’s still a large bezel below the display and a bezel on the top to house the webcam, but I’m fine with that. I’d much rather have a thicker top bezel so the webcam’s not aimed up my nose like on the Dell XPS 13 or MateBook X Pro. It’s unfortunate the webcam is mediocre and doesn’t support Windows Hello, though.

My review unit came with a full HD (1,920 x 1,080 resolution) matte display with a 144Hz refresh rate and no touchscreen. But you can buy it with a 60Hz screen as well. There will also be a version with a 4K touchscreen (3,840 x 2,160 resolution) and 60Hz refresh rate, which’ll be available later.

Practically all screen.

Practically all screen.

Image: raymond wong/mashable

Hardcore gamers will probably pick a faster refresh rate over more pixels and a touchscreen. It would have been great to get a model with both a 4K touchscreen and 144Hz, though. I realize that not everyone (especially gamers) cares about a touchscreen, but once you’re used to having it, it’s really hard to go back.

My unit is tuned with 100 percent sRGB color accuracy, and Razer says the 4K model has 100 percent Adobe RGB. In non-geek speak, it basically means the screen on the Blade 15 great if you do anything that requires accurate colors, like making prints.

Since I only used the computer for work and gaming, color accuracy wasn’t a priority. As far as my colleagues and I could tell, the screen looks fantastic. The 1080p resolution means it’s not the sharpest on a laptop, but it’s bright, viewing angles are great, and colors in games, photos and videos are vibrant.

Dat full-sized USB tho.

Dat full-sized USB tho.

Image: raymond wong/mashable

Full array of ports at your disposal.

Full array of ports at your disposal.

Image: raymond wong/mashable

Unlike other laptops, the Blade 15 isn’t lacking in ports. It doesn’t promise to be any laptop of the future embracing USB-C, forcing you into dongle hell. It’s got virtually all the ports you need today: three USB 3.1, one USB-C (Thunderbolt 3), one HDMI, one Mini DisplayPort 1.4, a Kensington lock port, and a headphone jack. 

The only thing missing is an SD card slot — a port that’s becoming increasingly rare on laptops. I guess you could argue gamers don’t need an SD card slot, but for creative professionals, like video editors and photographers, who are constantly downloading their footage for editing, it’s a bummer.

Tons of power

The Blade 15 is a gaming laptop and that means only one thing: It’s a freakin’ beast.

Besides the display’s fast refresh rate, the Blade 15 is powered by beefy specs: eighth-generation six-core Intel Core i7 8750H processor, either NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 or GTX 1070 Max-Q Design graphics, 16GB of RAM (user expandable up to 32GB), and 256GB or 512GB of super fast PCIe SSD storage.

The cheapest Blade starts at $1,899. My test model, which came with the more powerful GTX 1070 graphics and 512GB SSD, sells for $2,599.

Do you even Fortnite?

Do you even Fortnite?

Image: raymond wong/mashable

I was able to play popular games like Fornite on “epic” settings without seeing any hit to graphics performance. Similarly, other games I played like PUBG, Overwatch, and Destiny 2 ran well with proper tweaks to the settings. 

The GTX 1070 graphics chip is powerful enough to run VR as well. I hooked a HTC Vive Pro up and was able to reliably play Beat Saber and Super Hot. I noticed the occasional frame drop during VR sessions, but that’s to be expected of any GPU that’s less than a GTX 1080.

There is one side effect to all this power when gaming: heat dispersion. When pushed to its fullest, the Blade 15 got pretty warm and the fans kicked up. But that’s what you get when you cram so much processing and graphics performance into such a thin machine.

The bottom of the Blade 15 has rubber bumpers that raise the laptop up to help with heat dispersion.

The bottom of the Blade 15 has rubber bumpers that raise the laptop up to help with heat dispersion.

Image: raymond wong/mashable

Otherwise, the Blade 15 remained cool for most other tasks. 4K video streaming on YouTube? Cool. Chrome with 50 tabs open? Cool. Typing out this review? Cool to the touch.

Battery life was also rock-solid. I got anywhere between 4.5-6 hours of battery life — less while gaming and more for work stuff and continuous video streaming. For gaming, you’ll want to keep the Blade 15 plugged in most of the time or else you’ll only get maybe 3 hours of battery max.

Keyboard and trackpad

The keyboard and trackpad are excellent.

The keyboard and trackpad are excellent.

Image: RAYMOND WONG/MASHABLE

I’ve reviewed a number of Razer Blade laptops over the years and the keyboards have always been a delight to type on.

The Blade 15’s keys are every bit as springy and comfortable for furiously pounding out thousands of words for an article as they are for rapid-tapping for gaming.

And, of course, the keyboard’s Chroma lighting is configurable to glow in any of 16.8 million colors using the Razer Synapse app.

It’s almost the perfect keyboard, except for one change Razer made: the arrow keys. On the old Blades, the keyboard had full-sized left and right arrow keys and half-sized up and down arrow keys. I’m not saying the old arrow keys were perfect, but their half-sized keys were manageable.

Razer clearly didn’t feel the same because it changed the keyboard so that the up and down keys are full-sized. In theory, this sounds like a good idea, but by shifting the arrow keys one button to the left, it’s made messed with my muscle memory. 

The arrow keys are the worst.

The arrow keys are the worst.

Image: Raymond wong/mashable

Even after a few days of using the Blade 15 as my main computer, I kept hitting the function key, which now sits to the right of the right arrow key instead of the right arrow key itself. It drove me mad every single time. I’m all for full-size keys for all four arrow buttons, but messing with an already-established layout really throws the balance of the keyboard off. An easy fix would have been to maybe include little bumps (like the ones often used to mark the “F” and “J” keys) on the arrow keys so that you can easily feel them.

I’ve always liked the trackpads on Blade laptops and I mostly liked the one on the Blade 15. It’s larger and supports a number of multi-finger gestures, which is great. However, I found the default sensitivity settings just a bit too sensitive; dialing them down from high to medium settings made less likely to accidentally trigger them.

Beauty and power come at a price

Nothing but clean Windows 10 Pro, baby.

Nothing but clean Windows 10 Pro, baby.

Image: raymond wong/mashable

Razer’s Blade 15 (2018) is a monster of a gaming laptop, but of course it is — it’s a Razer Blade.

There are few things about the laptop that hold it back from perfection. Namely, the arrow-key layout is awfully hard to get used to, and the computer runs hot when it’s under heavy loads and games at ultra settings.

But if these complaints aren’t deal-breakers for you’ll find a lot to love in the Blade 15. The display’s fantastic (144Hz is a must if you’re a serious gamer), performance is tops, there are tons of ports, and it’s relatively light (for a gaming laptop).

You can for sure find alternative gaming laptops with similar specs, but none of them come in the same pretty package as the Blade 15. 

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