All posts in “Windows 10”

Microsoft is bringing its Edge browser to Android and iOS


While Microsoft is still officially working on the mobile version of Windows 10, it’s no secret that the company has all but given up on building its own mobile ecosystem. That only leaves Microsoft with one option: concede defeat and bring its applications to the likes of Android and iOS. That’s exactly what the company has been doing for the last few years and today the company announced that its Edge browser (the successor to the much — and often justly — maligned Internet Explorer) will soon come to iOS and Android, too. The company is also graduating its Arrow Launcher for Android and renaming it to Microsoft Launcher.

Even though Microsoft basically doesn’t play in the mobile OS and hardware space anymore, it still needs to have a presence on rival platforms if it doesn’t want to risk losing its relevancy on the desktop, too. Edge and the Microsoft Launcher are both key to this strategy because they’ll help the company to extend the Microsoft Graph even further. The Graph is Microsoft’s cross-platform system for allowing you to sync the state of your work and documents across devices and the company sees it as key to the future of Windows.

It’s no surprise then that this new version of Edge promises to make it easier to connect your PC and mobile device, with easy syncing of your browser sessions and other features.

For now, though, Edge for iOS and Android remain previews that you can sign up for here. The Android version will be available as a beta in the Google Play store soon and the iOS version will be made available through Testflight in the near future, too.

It’s worth noting that Microsoft won’t bring its own rendering engine to these platforms. Instead, it’ll rely on WebKit on iOS and the Blink engine on Android (and not the Android WebView control). On Android, this means that Microsoft is now actually shipping its own version of the Blink engine inside its app — and that’s not something we expected to hear anytime soon.

As for the launcher, it’s worth noting that it’s actually a quite capable Android launcher that nicely integrates with all of the Google apps you probably use every day (calendar, Gmail, etc.). Microsoft’s version of the Google Feed, that left-most homescreen on your Android device, is actually quite useful, too, and puts your calendar and other info front and center whereas Google now uses it for a general news feed.

Microsoft sends invites to mysterious ‘mixed reality’ event

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Microsoft is ready to reveal its next big move in mixed reality.

The company invited a handful of journalists to a intimate and rather mysterious San Francisco event on Oct. 3. On the agenda: A reveal of Microsoft’s full mixed-reality strategy and, perhaps, the next big steps.

The announcement comes as something of a surprise, since experts and pundits have spent weeks speculating that Microsoft’s next big event and product unveiling would happen on Oct. 31 when Microsoft Surface chief Panos Panay delivers a keynote at the Future Decoded event in London.

However, sources tell us that anyone expecting new Surface hardware at that event will be disappointed. Instead, Panay will focus on Microsoft’s aggressive Creativity push and how that’s shaping Microsoft’s current and future strategy.

That doesn’t mean however, that this new Oct. 3 event is about going to satisfy the demand for fresh Surface devices, either. In addition, even with the “Mixed Reality” tease, there won’t be a new HoloLens mixed reality headset for developers or consumers. 

Will there be any new hardware for us to sink our teeth into from Microsoft or its partners? No one is saying, but it’s fair to say the possibility exists.

As for the invite, it’s spare and offers few clues about what we’ll see on October 3, beyond, “This event is an opportunity to hear where Microsoft is headed next—and to experience Windows Mixed Reality for yourself.”

The ring leader for this experience is none other than Alex Kipman. Kipman, a technical fellow at Microsoft, invented HoloLens.

What we do know is that those who attend the Oct. 3 event will get their deepest immersion yet in Microsoft’s brand of mixed reality, which is actually a spectrum that runs from augmented reality experiences to full-immersive virtual reality.

Some of this will help lay the groundwork for the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update release on Oct. 17. That update integrates Microsoft’s mixed reality platform and allows third-party VR headsets (they start shipping on that same day), allowing them to work with the operating system and third-party experiences written to take advantage of Windows 10’s new AR and VR skills.

Microsoft is going to have a busy fall. In addition to the Windows 10 update release and this mixed-reality deep dive and potential product reveal, Microsoft is preparing to launch Xbox One X on Nov. 7. Xbox is a Windows 10 device as well, which means it will likely end up with more mixed-reality skills in the not-to-distant future.  

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Surface Laptop lets you restore back to Windows 10 S if you suddenly decide you hate apps

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Good news — no great news — the one thing that crippled Microsoft’s first laptop, the Surface Laptop, is no more.

As we said in our review, Windows 10 S and the fact that it only lets you install apps from the Windows Store (there’s no Chrome!) is too restrictive, and anybody who buys a Surface Laptop should immediately upgrade to Windows 10 Pro.

The downside to upgrading from 10 S to 10 Pro was that you couldn’t revert or “downgrade” back if you changed your mind later. Microsoft’s now reversed that somewhat hostile stance.

Less than week after releasing the Surface Laptop, Microsoft’s provided a “recovery image” for owners to effectively revert back to Windows 10 S if they made the upgrade to 10 Pro.

It’s a nice token for Surface Laptop owners, but it’s also not as simple as clicking a button. To get your machine running Windows 10 S again, you’ll need to perform a factory reset, which means it’ll erase everything. So you’ll want to backup your data onto an external hard drive or to the cloud before doing so.

You can find both the recovery image and instructions on how to restore your Surface Laptop to Windows 10 S on Microsoft’s website.

Microsoft’s Surface Laptop is one of the best Windows 10 laptops you can buy and a solid alternative to Apple’s MacBook Pro.

It’s got a high-res touchscreen, a keyboard wrapped in Alcantara fabric that doesn’t feel like you’re typing on a table, all-day battery life, and a full-sized USB 3.0 port so you can live a dongle-free life.

Surface Laptop owners can upgrade their machines from 10 S to 10 Pro for free until the end of the year. After that, it’s $50 for the upgrade, and will presumably cost you each time you want to upgrade again after factory resetting back to Windows 10 S. Although, it’s possible you could save your Windows 10 Pro license and reuse it later. We’ve reached out to Microsoft to clarify the upgrade fee after performing a factory reset.

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Razer’s new MacBook Pro slayer has no gimmicky Touch Bar

Razer, the company behind that crazy triple-screen laptop concept, will not stop until all other PC makers are its dust.

At this year’s E3 gaming expo, Razer refreshed its littlest laptop, the Blade Stealth, with the latest specs, and announced a new, toned down version with a larger screen (but the same dimensions) that ditches the brand’s neon green.

Is Razer finally growing up and shedding its gamer badge? Heck no. But at least you’ll be able to take your Stealth Blade to class or a meeting without looking like a total douchebag.

The Blade Stealth wowed us immediately with its stealthy compact aluminum design, 12-inch 4K-resolution IGZO touchscreen, solid Chroma-glowing keyboard and trackpad, and myriad ports.

It wasn’t much of a gaming laptop, but if you bolted on the Razer Core external GPU enclosure, you could definitely get desktop-class gaming performance out of it.

The new Blade Stealth has all of the things that made the original great, but now it’s got the latest seventh-generation Intel Core i7-7500U processors, better Intel HD Graphics 620, 16GB of RAM, up to 1TB of PCie SSD storage, and up to nine hours of battery life. All these specs will also hit your wallet kinda hard; a 512GB machine costs $1,599 and a 1TB $1,999.

If the 12.5-inch Blade Stealth screen’s a little too cramped for your liking, you might want to consider the more affordable 13.3-inch Blade Stealth, which starts at $1,399. It’s got a larger screen, but the body’s the exact same size as the 12.5-inch model, thanks to its slimmer bezels.

No glowing green logo on the gunmetal 13.3-inch Blade Stealth.

No glowing green logo on the gunmetal 13.3-inch Blade Stealth.

Image: LILI SAMS/MASHABLE

The 13.3-inch Blade Stealth has the same processor, RAM, and graphics as its smaller-sized brother, but it comes with one big difference: screen resolution. Whereas the 12.5-inch has a 3,840 x 2,160 (4K) touchscreen, the 13.3-inch only has a 3,200 x 1,800 (QHD+) touchscreen. Will you see much of a difference? Not at all.

It's also a touchscreen.

It’s also a touchscreen.

Image: LILI SAMS/MASHABLE

The larger-screened laptop also comes in two colors: black and gunmetal. 

Black comes with your standard Chroma-lit keyboard capable of glowing in 16.8 million colors per key, glowing green triple-headed snake logo, and green-colored USB ports. 

One Thunderbolt 3 port (USB-C), USB 3.0 port, and headphone jack.

One Thunderbolt 3 port (USB-C), USB 3.0 port, and headphone jack.

Image: Lili Sams/mashable

USB 3.0 port and full-sized HDMI port.

USB 3.0 port and full-sized HDMI port.

Image: lili sams/mashable

Gunmetal, however, is boardroom and classroom-ready. The backlit keyboard only lights up in white, the Razer logo on the lid is a more subtle polished gray, and the USB ports are standard silver. 

Some might find the gunmetal version dull (if you’re buying a Razer laptop, you’re not afraid to shout from rooftops you drink the green glow), but I personally prefer it over the standard black and green version. It’s too bad about the keyboard, though. I really wish it still had the Chroma keyboard.

Image: LILI SAMS/MASHABLE 

I’ve only had a few days to poke around with a pre-production gunmetal version, and so far it’s been pretty speedy. 

You just don’t realize how convenient it is to have full-sized USB and HDMI ports on your laptop until you’ve used laptops, like the new MacBook Pro, that don’t have them. That said, it’s also great to see a Thunderbolt USB-C port on the Blade Stealth, so you still get the best of both worlds.

Based on first impressions, I’d say the new 13.3-inch Blade Stealth is a better buy than the 12.5-inch version. The larger screen, despite its lower resolution, is roomier than the 12.5 despite having the same dimensions, and you get the same performance. Plus, no gimmicky Touch Bars.

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Microsoft’s Surface Laptop comes with one big suck, but it’s easily fixable

Like so many students, the very first laptop I had was a MacBook (the plastic one, not the new 2-pounder). I bought it in the summer of 2007 after finishing my first year of college, and it lasted until I graduated.

I loved the machine even though it weighed a hefty five pounds and was an inch thick. It’s a tank by today’s thin and light laptop standards, but you have to remember something: Back then, a one-inch thick machine was the definition of thin.

Steve Jobs wouldn’t famously pull the MacBook Air out of a manila envelope until a year later, and the laptop wouldn’t go on to become the most popular laptop until 2010 when it got a redesign with more ports.

In the last decade, MacBooks have morphed into the gold standard. They’re still more expensive and underpowered compared to Windows laptops, but for students and professionals, Apple’s machines expertly balance style and performance.

Chromebooks are also a popular option for many students, but their inability to run many “real” apps outside of Google Docs, underpowered web apps, and Android apps (if your machine supports them), makes them less viable for many college students (at least according to the dozen or so that I asked).

Apple’s MacBook domination on campuses and in Starbucks is arguably the strongest case for why Microsoft’s first clamshell laptop, the Surface Laptop, exists. 

Unmistakably Surface-y

The Surface Laptop is made of durable aluminum.

The Surface Laptop is made of durable aluminum.

Image: lili sams/mashable

The Surface Laptop builds on the Surface Pro’s success. Although the Surface Pro was never meant to sell in volume — it’s mostly an aspirational reference design meant to nudge PC makers towards Microsoft’s 2-in-1 vision — it has helped ingrain this idea that Microsoft is an underdog that builds hardware Apple won’t.

Just like how you know an Apple product when you see one, the same goes for Microsoft’s entire lineup of Surface devices.

The Surface Laptop is a very handsome machine. It comes in silver, gold, blue, and burgundy — all very attractive colors. The 2.76 pound laptop is lighter than the 13-inch MacBook Air and MacBook Pro, and thinner, too.

Its aluminum body is sturdy and sits firmly on a table or on your lap. The Surface Laptop has a wedge-shaped design and flaunts it hard; you won’t find rounded tapers to create the illusion that its thinner.

You only get one USB 3.0 port, Mini DisplayPort, and headphone jack. Woulda been nice to get two USBs.

You only get one USB 3.0 port, Mini DisplayPort, and headphone jack. Woulda been nice to get two USBs.

Image: LILI SAMS/MASHABLE

Most of its ports (USB 3.0, Mini DisplayPort, and headphone jack) sit on the left side. On the right side is a lone SurfaceConnect magnetic plug. I appreciate the full-sized USB 3.0 port, but one just isn’t enough; a second one would have been great, or at least one USB-C port. There’s also no SD card slot (a trend I don’t like), which basically means students will need to buy a separate memory card reader or a USB hub to get more ports. Even though Microsoft thinks USB-C isn’t ready for primetime, you’ll probably still end up in #donglehell.

That's not an SD card slot. It's the SurfaceConnect magnetic charging port.

That’s not an SD card slot. It’s the SurfaceConnect magnetic charging port.

Image: LILI SAMS/MASHABLE

The number of ports may be a little lacking, but the screen, keyboard and trackpad are sublime.

The 13.5-inch PixelSense touchscreen (2,256 x 1,504 resolution) has super slim bezels around it, and it’s covered with scratch-resistant Gorilla Glass 3. I found the screen both remarkably sharp and bright, and incredibly responsive. 

The touchscreen is excellent.

The touchscreen is excellent.

Image: LILI SAMS/MASHABLE

I used to feel touchscreens on a laptop were silly, especially on Windows machines, which have tiny icons not designed for fingers, but I now really like them. “Gorilla arm” isn’t really an issue since you’re not using the touchscreen all the time, only sometimes. It’s a shame Apple thinks touchscreens are wrong for Macs. My only qualm with the touchscreen is how it wobbles when you poke at it, but that’s a necessary concession to get the screen so thin.

Hate the MacBook's flat keyboard? Surface Laptop's keys are superb.

Hate the MacBook’s flat keyboard? Surface Laptop’s keys are superb.

Image: LILI SAMS/MASHABLE

The keyboard and trackpad are some of the best I’ve ever used on a laptop. If you’ve typed on a Surface Pro or Surface Book, you’ll know how bouncy the keys are — the Surface Laptop’s keys with 1.5mm travel are satisfying and the opposite of the flat-as-hell keys on Apple’s MacBooks (the Air’s still got the old keys, though). 

Likewise, the trackpad is exceptionally smooth and nearly on par with a MacBook’s. That Microsoft can make a great trackpad only upsets me more that PC makers like HP and Lenovo still can’t get their shit together.

It looks great now, but how well will the Alcantara fabric hold up over time?

It looks great now, but how well will the Alcantara fabric hold up over time?

Image: LILI SAMS/MASHABLE

The most eye-catching thing about the keyboard and trackpad is, of course, the Alcantara fabric that surrounds it. The soft touch material is indeed soft and really keeps your fingers warm when you’re typing and scrolling. Microsoft says the material’s got a “polyurethane covering for durability, including water and chemical resistance.” 

I’m not sure how well the Alcantara cover will hold up to years of Cheetos dust, Red Bull spills, and whatever other gross things it may come into contact with in a dorm room. But I can tell you the edges on my review unit started to fray a little after a week in my bag.

I tested the $1,299 model with 7th-gen Intel Core Intel Core i5-7200U, Intel HD 620 graphics, 8GB of RAM, and 256GB of SSD storage, and it powered through like a real champ. 

I wasn’t gaming on it or anything (mostly web browsing, typing, and streaming Netflix and YouTube videos) — just typical college student stuff — but even so it never chugged. I can’t speak for the 4GB model, though. But based on my past experience testing laptops with 4GB of RAM I can tell you they bottleneck very quickly.

Walled in

The Surface Laptop runs Windows 10 S. It’s Windows 10, but with one huge caveat: You can only install apps from the Windows Store. In this regard, Windows 10 S is basically like iOS.

Microsoft gives a few reasons for why Windows 10 S is better for students. One, it’s safer. Barring users from downloading and installing apps (from who knows where) means fewer virus-infested machines. Two, allowing Windows Store-approved apps improves performance and battery life. And three, Windows 10 S computers are easier to manage by network admins who want to quickly deploy a specific version and set of apps to devices.

You’d be stupid to say no to security and better performance, but are they worth restricting yourself to apps only in the Windows Store?

For me, the answer is no. I need Chrome for work and I use many apps that aren’t available in the Windows Store. But I’m not the target audience — students are — so I asked a bunch of my friends’ siblings who are in high school or college. 

What happens when you search for Chrome (it doesn't exist) n the Windows Store.

What happens when you search for Chrome (it doesn’t exist) n the Windows Store.

Image: screenshot: raymond wong/mashable

No surprise, all of them gave Windows 10 S’s huge app restriction a thumbs down. Sure, Windows 10 S runs Office 365, Google Docs works just fine in Edge, and you’ll find some popular apps like Netflix, VLC Player, but if you want, for example, Adobe’s Create Suite (Photoshop, Lightroom, Premiere, etc.) or even another web browser, you’re totally screwed unless the app makes it into the Windows Store.

You could probably find alternative apps, but college students often use custom apps that come with their textbooks — none of which will work on the Surface Laptop unless… you upgrade to Windows 10 Pro.

Students I asked all gave Windows 10 S’s huge app restriction a thumbs down.

Surface Laptop owners can upgrade from Windows 10 S to Windows 10 Pro and basically remove the Windows Store-only apps restriction until December 31, 2017. After that, upgrading will cost $50. 

But while upgrading to Windows 10 Pro will “un-cripple” the Surface Laptop (there’s no going back to Windows 10 S), it comes at the expense of the aforementioned advantages.

You could argue that there’s no such thing as a truly secure computer — it’ll always be a cat and mouse game between Microsoft and hackers — and no laptop truly gets all-day battery life with real-world usage (I got around 6-8 hours of mixed usage; Microsoft advertises up to 14.5 hours of local video playback), and I agree.

How’s a student supposed to pick? I say be fearless and just upgrade. The Surface Laptop doesn’t get significantly slower and the power adapter’s compact enough to lug around. It’s not like it’s 2005 and laptops only get two hours of battery life on a single charge.

Making a decision

Surface Laptop might be the best alternative to the MacBook Air/Pro.

Surface Laptop might be the best alternative to the MacBook Air/Pro.

Image: LILI SAMS/MASHABLE

The Surface Laptop can be summed up in a single word: finally.

After years of beating the 2-in-1 drum, Microsoft’s finally made a laptop that’s a real laptop through and through (sorry, but the Surface Pro isn’t a laptop if the keyboard isn’t included).

The Surface Laptop starts at $999, but nobody should buy this model; 4GB of RAM won’t get anyone very far. Which means the lowest-priced model to consider is the $1,299 version I tested. (Don’t forget to add $50 to upgrade to Windows 10 Pro if you miss the cutoff by the end of year.)

A $999 MacBook Air (2017) gets you more ports and double the RAM, but also a lower non-touch display and punier graphics. The new $1,299 MacBook Pro (non-Touch Bar) is a more comparable machine, and it’s got the better specs for the same money (without a touchscreen, of course).

It’s a tough call. How important is a touchscreen to you?

For a first laptop, Microsoft got a lot right. It’s not perfect (no laptop is), but it’s damn close and it’s still one of the better Windows 10 laptops that I actually wanted to keep using because the hardware is so nice. 

But if you buy one, do your self a favor and upgrade to Windows 10 Pro ASAP.

Microsoft Surface Laptop

The Good

Bright, high-res touchscreen Fantastic keyboard and trackpad Speedy performance Great battery life

The Bad

Apps restricted to Windows Store unless you upgrade to 10 Pro No SD card slot No USB-C port $50 to upgrade to Win 10 Pro in 2018

The Bottom Line

Microsoft’s first laptop is a winner, but only if you upgrade it.

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